An EV with Built-in Solar Panels Is Here

As predicted here is an extended range EV with a built-in solar panel:
All-Electric. Dynamic. Driver-Centric.
Ride the Sunshine

With the Fisker Ocean’s revolutionary full-length SolarSky roof, you can harvest the sun’s rays to generate free energy to support the vehicle’s battery-powered motor. When fully exposed to the sun, the Fisker Ocean Extreme’s SolarSky can produce up to 1,500 clean, emissions-free miles per year, and under ideal conditions may increase to beyond 2000 miles* – all powered by pure sunshine.

https://www.fiskerinc.com/ocean

NH

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Hey NH,

That Fisker looks awesome. I wonder how it would do in the past 15 days when there has been absolutely NO SUN out in the Boston area? Do I push it out of the garage when the sun finally comes out?

'38Packard

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That Fisker looks awesome. I wonder how it would do in the past 15 days when there has been absolutely NO SUN out in the Boston area? Do I push it out of the garage when the sun finally comes out?

'38Packard

Just plug it in. And remember electricity is far less expensive than gasoline for the equivalent milage.

But I found you comment funny. Give you credit for that.

It still gets some juice from the panels on cloudy days but obviously its best performance is on a sunny day. Also don’t forget that the idea behind the panels is to give additional power and to extend the mileage.

I have had a Mickey Mouse Seiko Solar watch for several years and it does not stop working on cloudy days or at night.

According to CNBC this morning 65% of all cars sold in always sunny Norway were EV’s in 2021.

NH

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According to CNBC this morning 65% of all cars sold in always sunny Norway were EV’s in 2021.

NH,

I can hear it now.

“That is because there are only 4 million people in Norway. We have 30 million children who will not buy an EV”.

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“We have 30 million children who will not buy an EV”.

But they may drive them as two families on our street have little electric cars for their kids. One has an electric Jeep and the other has a pink electric “Barbie” car.

See even little children know about EV’s. :-}

NH

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According to CNBC this morning 65% of all cars sold in always sunny Norway were EV’s in 2021.

I can hear it now. "That is because there are only 4 million people in Norway…

That and the fact that they don’t have to pay sales tax on an EV, thus getting a 25% discount.

DB2

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“When fully exposed to the sun, the Fisker Ocean Extreme’s SolarSky can produce up to 1,500 clean, emissions-free miles per year, and under ideal conditions may increase to beyond 2000 miles* – all powered by pure sunshine.”

Let’s see…that’s all of 30 miles PER WEEK.

With the average driver driving 15,000 miles per year…or 300 miles a week…it’s not even a significant drop in the bucket. One hail storm and it won’t even be that.

A 3x4 foot 150 watt solar panel you can buy at any outdoor company and probably walmart will generate enough power a week to run your car 30 miles and cost all of $150 or less.

If you subscribe to ‘Green Energy’ - which you can do at often a trivial increase in per KW rate…you can run your EV totally on ‘green energy’ and not have to worry about cloudy days.

How many people drive 30 miles a WEEK only - and that is when the sun is shining?

It’s really a joke - putting ‘green’ lipstick on a car and claiming revolutionary technology.


NH:“According to CNBC this morning 65% of all cars sold in always sunny Norway were EV’s in 2021.”

Yeah riding ‘free’ on tollways and the $10 bridge tolls makes it easy to consider buying an EV - especially since gas is $6/gal and has been up to $9/gal. Diesel peaked at $12/gal.

but you’ll not that 35% of all cars AREN’T EVs…those are the family wagons for long trips, hauling things, delivery vans, trucks, garbage trucks, snow plows, etc.

t.

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At the start of the horseless carriage the complaints were limited miles between breakdowns, constant flat tires, not good in mud or snow, noisy, and not good in cold weather.

Sound familiar.

NH

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NH:"At the start of the horseless carriage the complaints were limited miles between breakdowns, constant flat tires, not good in mud or snow, noisy, and not good in cold weather.

Sound familiar."

and that’s why all the early EVs died quickly when ICE cars arrived. A Model T was great for mud and snow and worked fine in cold weather. EV batteries died in cold weather. Model T would go 300 miles on a tank of gas.

All cars back then had constant flats and that lasted up to the 1970s when radial tires and steel belted tires arrived. Bias ply tires lasted 20,000 miles on all cars in the 1920s to 1960s. Along every travel route you’d have a service station every 15 miles to add oil to the car, fix flats, and other mechanical repairs like leaky hoses, over heating, wheel bearings, etc.

EVs will have their own sets of problems…‘Computer Error 8012 - car cannot start’ , "Error Code 9119 - critical - car shutting down’…

t.

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t,

but you’ll not(sp) that 35% of of all cars AREN’T EV’s…

And that number use to be 100%. I believe they call 100 decreased to 35 a downward trend.

NH

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When fully exposed to the sun, the Fisker Ocean Extreme’s SolarSky can produce up to 1,500 clean, emissions-free miles per year, and under ideal conditions may increase to beyond 2000 miles* – all powered by pure sunshine.

That’s nice. Let’s assume that “ideal conditions” equate to “fully exposed” for a mere 8 hours a day 5 days a week - odds are it would be at least 12 hours a day on average and 7 days a week but I want to give it all the credit I can.

That’s over 2,000 hours a year.

So if things go really well, when you really need the solar power it’ll let you go at an average speed a bit shy of 1 MPH.

How much would the battery-based range improve if the solar panels and related specialized circuitry were removed?

Okay, ONE MORE TIME. The solar panels add to the existing power supply and do NOT replace the existing batteries. It is equivalent carrying extra oats to feed the horse on your buggy. Instead of limiting the speed and range it increases both by refueling as you go. Similar to the recharging of the batteries you get when braking.

Try thinking of it as having a bottomless gas can in the back of your truck.

NH

Okay, ONE MORE TIME. The solar panels add to the existing power supply and do NOT replace the existing batteries.

You misunderstand warrl’s post:

How much would the battery-based range improve if the solar panels and related specialized circuitry were removed?

By making the vehicle lighter you increase it’s range. How much additional range would the vehicle have without the weight of the solar panel feature all else in the vehicle remaining equal?

The Captain

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NH: It is equivalent carrying extra oats to feed the horse on your buggy. Instead of limiting the speed and range it increases both by refueling as you go."

If you read the article, under IDEAL conditions the solar panels add 30 miles a WEEK to your range. For the average driver driving 300 miles a week…that is hardly a ‘bottomless’ gas tank.

You still have to charge up those 270 miles and under non ideal weather, likely All of the 300 miles you drive. In those cases they are useless. If you park your car in a garage at work, it gets no sun. If it’s under a car port when home on weekends, it gets no sun.

You’re EV range already includes regenerate braking.

Carrying 350 lbs of oats around for your horse in your horse and buggy probably makes the horse consume an extra 50 lbs of food a day …beside him having to eat 1000 lbs of oats a week to haul you and the wagon around for a week.

t.

Cap,

The solar panel IS the roof so unless you ARE only driving on rain free days, in which case you might as well have solar, you would be adding back in the weight of a steel roof.

The rest of warri’s post is about running the car on solar at 1 mph so there was no misunderstanding.

NH

What you ALL are missing is the fact that in previous multiple posts the consensus was that you can’t have solar panels on a car. Too big, not enough power, it will never work, then lo and behold a car with a built-in solar panel.

While it is first generation tech it has been done!

Some of you may need to look up the definition of a Luddite.

NH

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Try thinking of it as having a bottomless gas can in the back of your truck.

Bottomless, but the tube connecting it to your power train has half the internal diameter of a hypodermic needle.

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The solar panel is weightless?

What you ALL are missing is the fact that in previous multiple posts the consensus was that you can’t have solar panels on a car.

I was not part of that consensus.

I was and am of the opinion that yes you certainly can have solar panels on a car, but it is probably not worth the extra cost and may - note may - actually be worse than not having them.