Body weight has big impact on brain function

Captain Obvious strikes again.

It turns out that diet and exercise are necessary. Add that to Wendy’s recommendation of get enough sleep and you just might save your brain.

Choices have consequences (another no-brainer). The good news is that the controls are in our hands.

But didn’t we already know this stuff?

vol

In fact, according to Amen, the findings support the idea that, when it comes to the risk of developing Alzheimer’s disease, people “have way more control than [they] may think.”

He continued, “Weight hurts the brain. I want people to care enough about their brains that they will work to get their bodies healthy”

“One of the most important lessons we have learned through 30 years of performing functional brain imaging studies is that brains can be improved when you put them in a healing environment by adopting brain-healthy habits, such as a healthy calorie-smart diet and regular exercise.”

https://www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2020/08/200805110127.h…

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“One of the most important lessons we have learned through 30 years of performing functional brain imaging studies is that brains can be improved when you put them in a healing environment by adopting brain-healthy habits, such as a healthy calorie-smart diet and regular exercise.”

Was this already know in antiquity?

“Mens sana in corpore sano” is Latin for “A healthy mind in a healthy body” but it’s not quite as old as the Romans…

http://ancientolympics.arts.kuleuven.be/eng/TE010EN.html

The Captain

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… explained Daniel G. Amen, MD, the study’s lead author and founder of Amen Clinics,

Not to totally dismiss the findings that being obese is not healthy, Amen is one of the quacks whose infomertials infest PBS stations during pledge drives.

Daniel Gregory Amen (born July 1954)[1] is an American celebrity doctor[1] who practices as a psychiatrist[2] and brain disorder specialist[3] as director of the Amen Clinics.[4] He is a five-times New York Times best-selling author as of 2012.[5]

Amen has built a profitable business around the use of SPECT (single-photon emission computed tomography) imaging for purported diagnostic purposes.[6] His marketing of SPECT scans and much of what he says about the brain and health in his books, media appearances, and marketing of his clinics has been condemned by scientists and doctors as lacking scientific validity and as being unethical, especially since the way SPECT is used in his clinics exposes people to harmful radiation with no clear benefit.

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Daniel_Amen

Steve

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"… explained Daniel G. Amen, MD, the study’s lead author and founder of Amen Clinics,

Not to totally dismiss the findings that being obese is not healthy, Amen is one of the quacks whose infomertials infest PBS stations during pledge drives.

Daniel Gregory Amen (born July 1954)[1] is an American celebrity doctor[1] who practices as a psychiatrist[2] and brain disorder specialist[3] as director of the Amen Clinics.[4] He is a five-times New York Times best-selling author as of 2012.[5]

Amen has built a profitable business around the use of SPECT (single-photon emission computed tomography) imaging for purported diagnostic purposes.[6] His marketing of SPECT scans and much of what he says about the brain and health in his books, media appearances, and marketing of his clinics has been condemned by scientists and doctors as lacking scientific validity and as being unethical, especially since the way SPECT is used in his clinics exposes people to harmful radiation with no clear benefit.

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Daniel_Amen

Steve"


Everyone is always trying to sell you something.

Howie52
People even will try to sell you nothing.
Being convinced to pay money for what used to be available for the asking is one of the
older marketing ploys.

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Higher BMI is linked…

This is a weak point for the study. From what I can tell, didn’t take into account body composition or body fat. If strictly BMI, you will catch some healthy people in the overweight category. Maybe enough to skew results.

For example, at 6’1 1/2" and 203 lbs, my BMI is 26.6. Clearly overweight by strict BMI definitions. But I have body fat around 7%, so by appearance not overweight.

JLC - who used to have a 3% body fat in college

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IS IT “just a coincidence” that Dr. Amen

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Daniel_Amen

looks like the clone of “Heaven’s Gate’s” Marshall Applewhite?

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Marshall_Applewhite

I THINK NOT!

sunrayman
{future}Founder, Anti-Charlatan League of the Americas (ACLOTA)

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These authors always hit a goldmine when it comes to selling anything to do with brain health, body weight, sex drive, looking younger, on and on.

What was that advertising for? Lose Weight Now, Ask Me How? Ugh!

At this point, it is well-known that the BMI (simply a quick “rule of thumb” measurement) is not applicable to athletes and those who have higher than average muscle mass and lower than average fat mass. Like basketball players for example.

One new measure I read about is:

If your waist in inches is more than 50% of your height in inches…you are overweight or obese…

Does not apply to pregnant ‘persons’.

t.

At this point, it is well-known that the BMI (simply a quick rule of thumb" measurement) is not applicable to athletes…

Indeed…but in this day and age in the US, so few folk with a BMI trending towards the upper limit of “overweight” or obese and above actually fall into this category, it’s almost a distinction not worth making. Quite the reverse. From what I’ve observed, even folk who look as if their BMI falls within or close to the “healthy” range rarely look anywhere close to athletic.

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It says that the overweight are 72% of the population, and the obese are 42% of the population. I thought that the obesity rate was “only” 36%.

Oops, never mind. The obese are 42% of the overweight, not 42% of the population.

Indeed…but in this day and age in the US, so few folk with a BMI trending towards the upper limit of “overweight” or obese and above actually fall into this category, it’s almost a distinction not worth making. Quite the reverse. From what I’ve observed, even folk who look as if their BMI falls within or close to the “healthy” range rarely look anywhere close to athletic.

It is indeed true that the USA is ridiculously obese and out of shape on average, and that it all happened since the 60s. But the distinction is sometimes important, for example, when an insurance company uses it for rating or for eligibility for certain benefits.

You can get dizzy overthinking this stuff. I recently read a meta analysis claiming higher mortality for underweight seniors. At 6’2” and 160 ponds at 66 years of age, I allegedly fell in the underweight category for my age group.

As long as I feel good and my annual blood readings are good, I plan to ignore my BMI,

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At 6’2” and 160 ponds at 66 years of age, I allegedly fell in the underweight category for my age group.

Being 6’2" and 160 pounds gives you a Body Mass Index of 20.5. That’s within the normal range.

Keep reading. Some studies recommend a higher range for seniors, with mortality stats to back it up.

Keep reading. Some studies recommend a higher range for seniors, with mortality stats to back it up.

So NOW I find out. AFTER I’ve rolled back years of weight gain by completely ditching junk foods and restaurant foods. At least I’m part of the Goonies and Saved By The Bell Generation, so I’m not a senior citizen yet. So that means I have plenty of time to gain weight.

However, I wonder if the need for a higher BMI really applies to everyone. I’ve always been naturally thin. Also, I wonder how many of the casualties with lower BMIs got there because an illness (such as cancer) caused them to lose weight. I find it hard to believe that the secret to living longer would consist of eating at Kentucky Fried Cholesterol and The Cheesecake Factory. I suspect that if you removed the people who lost weight because of a deadly illness from the equation, the death rates for those with the lower BMIs would be much lower.

Your follow up questions have also been studied in some detail. Harvard did a meta analysis that purports to back up your claim - that if you account for all the super thin people with cancer, the remaining super thin people live longer. Other studies contradict that claim.

I have long since stopped worrying about it.

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