Compare MongoDB to MySQL RDMS

https://www.mongodb.com/compare/mongodb-mysql

“For example, Cisco migrated its ecommerce platform from a legacy relational database to MongoDB. As a result, it has improved customer experience by reducing latency 8x and eliminated downtime during system upgrades. Its development teams can build and release new applications faster, while the company’s e-commerce platform can tap into the business agility enabled by cloud compiting. “

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“For example, Cisco migrated its ecommerce platform from a legacy relational database to MongoDB. As a result, it has improved customer experience by reducing latency 8x and eliminated downtime during system upgrades. Its development teams can build and release new applications faster, while the company’s e-commerce platform can tap into the business agility enabled by cloud compiting. “

How much of that is that attributable to using MongoDB and how much to using newer development methods and environments? The first bullet in MongoDB’s white paper states (highlight added):

Demands for higher developer productivity and faster time to market, with traditional rigid relational data models and waterfall development of monolithic applications giving way to agile methodologies, microservices, and DevOps, compressing release cycles from months and years to days and weeks.

Because I’ve been researching MongoDB (and bought a starter position) I’ve been reading about Waterfall and Agile and assessing how they differ from what I was doing in 1960 and today. In 1960 I was not thinking in term of systems. The client had a problem and I wrote a computer program to solve it. The process was to draw a logic flow chart of the proposed program, write the code, debug it, and run it. It was all home made. I had one case where a program written in the traditional manner would not fit in the computer so I wrote an operating system. I only found out that I had written an OS much later when reading some programming journal. Back then when you had a problem you found a solution and in time these became codified. One of the very popular early publications was The Mythical Man-Month by Frederick Brooks. That’s where I first came across the quip, “A baby takes nine months to be born no matter how many women you assign to the task.”

Not to get bogged down in history, Waterfall dates back to 1970, The Mythical Man-Month to 1975, to Agile to 2001. The first two are about monolithic systems, much improved from what I was doing but still “monolithic.” Agile, by contrast, is incremental development, ship bits as they become operational, which is inline with the finding of operations research of the 1950s, tackle the easy parts first and leave the complex ones for later.

The point I’m making is that it’s not exclusively changing databases that accelerates system development and user experience, it’s the progress being made in system engineering as a whole, DB management being just one part and I’m not convinced the most significant part is changing databases. The productivity enhancement of moving from Waterfall to Agile is huge.

Denny Schlesinger

The Mythical Man-Month: https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/The_Mythical_Man-Month

Waterfall: https://airbrake.io/blog/sdlc/waterfall-model

Agile: http://agilemethodology.org/

PS: TMF’s editor was eating my posts so I wrote a browser based editor that saves my files while working, about a couple of day’s work. That would have been impossible before the invention of the browser and the languages I used (php & Javascript). Progress is accelerating and I won’t add “exponentially” because acceleration is exponential by definition:

A = distance / time squared

http://softwaretimes.com/pics/editor.png

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Denny makes a good point here … that one is replacing more than the DB. This is particularly true when the existing system is on a mainframe, since the code there may be truly ancient. I should also note that at least some modern relational databases can closely approximate 365x24 operation including on-line schema changes.

When developing, expect bugs! Sorry but my post lost the formatting to a bug. :frowning:

Let’s try again…

“For example, Cisco migrated its ecommerce platform from a legacy relational database to MongoDB. As a result, it has improved customer experience by reducing latency 8x and eliminated downtime during system upgrades. Its development teams can build and release new applications faster, while the company’s e-commerce platform can tap into the business agility enabled by cloud compiting. “

How much of that is that attributable to using MongoDB and how much to using newer development methods and environments? The first bullet in MongoDB’s white paper states (highlight added):

Demands for higher developer productivity and faster time to market, with traditional rigid relational data models and waterfall development of monolithic applications giving way to agile methodologies, microservices, and DevOps, compressing release cycles from months and years to days and weeks.

Because I’ve been researching MongoDB (and bought a starter position) I’ve been reading about Waterfall and Agile and assessing how they differ from what I was doing in 1960 and today. In 1960 I was not thinking in term of systems. The client had a problem and I wrote a computer program to solve it. The process was to draw a logic flow chart of the proposed program, write the code, debug it, and run it. It was all home made. I had one case where a program written in the traditional manner would not fit in the computer so I wrote an operating system. I only found out that I had written an OS much later when reading some programming journal. Back then when you had a problem you found a solution and in time these became codified. One of the very popular early publications was The Mythical Man-Month by Frederick Brooks. That’s where I first came across the quip, “A baby takes nine months to be born no matter how many women you assign to the task.”

Not to get bogged down in history, Waterfall dates back to 1970, The Mythical Man-Month to 1975, to Agile to 2001. The first two are about monolithic systems, much improved from what I was doing but still “monolithic.” Agile, by contrast, is incremental development, ship bits as they become operational, which is inline with the finding of operations research of the 1950s, tackle the easy parts first and leave the complex ones for later.

The point I’m making is that it’s not exclusively changing databases that accelerates system development and user experience, it’s the progress being made in system engineering as a whole, DB management being just one part and I’m not convinced the most significant part is changing databases. The productivity enhancement of moving from Waterfall to Agile is huge.

Denny Schlesinger

The Mythical Man-Month: https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/The_Mythical_Man-Month

Waterfall: https://airbrake.io/blog/sdlc/waterfall-model

Agile: http://agilemethodology.org/

PS: TMF’s editor was eating my posts so I wrote a browser based editor that saves my files while working, about a couple of day’s work. That would have been impossible before the invention of the browser and the languages I used (php & Javascript). Progress is accelerating and I won’t add “exponentially” because acceleration is exponential by definition:

A = distance / time squared

http://softwaretimes.com/pics/editor.png

1 Like

Node.js is making a play in there. It’s not just the storing of data. It’s getting it in and out that seems to be changing.