European Electricity Prices go Negative

An imbalance between demand and a gusher of renewable energy sent electricity prices negative in Europe over the weekend.

Policy makers will have to figure out how to balance the demand.

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@DrBob2

I can now say that yes I have seen power that is free. :grin:

Andy

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These are wholesale electricity prices. Someone please show me where the average retail residential customer is being paid to consume electricity?

  • Pete
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Apologies for the confusion. I thought that was made clear in the article these were wholesale prices.

As stated in the article, residential prices remain unchanged.

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I am old enough to remember when the nuclear industry promised us that electricity would be so inexpensive to produce it would be “too cheap to meter.”

Too cheap to meter - Wikipedia.

Maybe they didn’t realize that the nuclear power source would be 93 million miles away.

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I am old enough to remember it being said that we would have 5G for everyone and it would be at least 1 gig up and down.

Andy

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I don’t know about “average”, but apparently some customers use electric supply companies that really do pay them to consume electricity when the wholesale price goes negative. There were a few stories like this one, mostly from Europe, with examples of people getting paid to charge their car on days of excess supply.

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I was just hoping for free now they are going to pay me? Life can’t get any better than getting paid to heat my pool in the winter time. Life is going to be amazing.

Andy

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Well, you might be able to heat it from 12:20pm to 12:50pm on a random Wednesday. That isn’t going to heat it much at all. Negative electricity prices rarely last for very long. Dispatchable generation sources can be (and are) turned off when that happens.

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Those were the day when the internut was free. Nuclearwaste.com

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