How I learned to love COVID

Dr. Saunalove or: How I learned to love COVID.

I have concluded that COVID is here to stay. No amount of vaccination or “herd immunity” is ever going to make it disappear. It will be with us for the rest of our lives and beyond.

And I don’t say this pessimistically–I am not despondent about it. One of the things about life is to simply embrace what is. COVID is.

So, what to do?

Very simple: I am actively arranging both my business and personal planning to align with a world where COVID is part of the environment. For my business, I’m moving activity as much online/Zoom/Teams as possible (even more than in the past year and a half). Longer term, I’m outsourcing everything necessary to allow remote working.

Personally, I am reorienting my free time towards fitness and music–to make use of more time at home to feel fulfilled and healthy. We are planning our vacations in destinations where we can drive, renting AirBNBs*, and minimizing the possibility that an outbreak will disrupt our plans. We will also get every vaccination booster recommended by the health authorities, continue to wear masks in public, and wash our hands every chance we get.

But, with full vaccination plus a booster, I am not afraid of COVID. I’m not going to volunteer to get it by partying at night clubs with a bunch of unvaccinated young people (they never invite me to the good parties anyway). But, it is time to start living again.

And maybe I’m wrong. Maybe the pandemic unexpectedly ends. In such a situation, I can keep the modifications in my life that are good, and go back to my old ways with the things I miss–like concerts.

With that, I wish you all health, happiness, and prosperity for 2022.

*Saunafool owns shares of ABNB

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I love SARS-Cov-2 because we’re being forced to learn a lot, and knowledge is a good thing. Humans need a good smack upside the head occasionally. It will pay dividends when the next pandemic hits since the next one may well be worse.

I love it because I’m taking virology classes, and they are fascinating! I probably never would have done this if I hadn’t been forced to sort out good information from bad (which is no easy thing when what we think we know changes daily).

I love it because a certain segment of society has clearly self-identified as being not worth my time. Life is short, it can be shorter than we expect, and it’s best to seek out those with whom we can have healthy, emotionally satisfying, and mutually beneficial relationships.

I love it because we introverts are coming into our own. When I was growing up, people still believed you could make introverted kids become extroverted by regularly applied, forced socializing. (No you couldn’t and no it didn’t.) But now, introversion has survival value! We can remain isolated for long stretches and not lose our minds! Resilience ‘R’ Us.

I love it because, of all the challenges currently facing our country and the world, I think it’s actually the most solvable and least frightening. Eventually we’ll all get covid, either vaxxed or unvaxxed, and the pandemic will resolve itself with out without our cooperation. I’m not so optimistic about our other challenges.

OK, yeah - challenges bring opportunities, including investment opportunities. Being isolated gives us lots of time to study these things.

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I’m kind of in alignment with Saunafool.

I have decided that COVID is here to stay. We are double vaxxed and boosted (and I would have no problem with an additional booster every six months if it would help protect us.

Our neck of the woods is currently running nearly 25% positive for COVID and I have decided to bug out.

Tomorrow morning I am boarding a cruise ship for six months (unless screwed up by COVID). I figure, with all passengers and crew vaccinated (and many passengers boosted) there is far less chance of catching COVID than at my local Costco. I don’t expect much of an itinerary (the published one is obviously science fiction) and it will require almost constant masking (I have half a suitcase of good quality ones). While to some, a cruise around the world would be a trip of a lifetime and every port omitted a painful slice, we have visited most of the world’s more frequented ports a number of times (and stayed a week or more in many of them) and while I miss not spending time in some of them, I’ve got enough T-shirts to last a lifetime - and the cruise is simply the best way I can think of to avoid crowds of infected people. Hopefully by the time we get back, this surge will be over.

Of course I could be completely wrong in, oh so many ways.

Anyone who wants updates along the way, send me a message off-line.

Jeff