Modem-router

Olympic Peninsula is one of the beautiful places. I suspect my suggestion won’t work – but maybe. T-Mobile - the Cellphone folks are hitting the country with 5G Wireless internet service. This is less than a year old. Map below shows their cell service and it does include most of the peninsula’s population - places like Forks and Sequim.

Call them and ask. I live in Gainesville, GA and there is a 5G antenna about almost 2 miles from my house. It offers more than 100 Mbs signal via 5G WiFi and the advertised price is $50/month including all fees and taxes. We have T-Mobile for our cellular service and it great. We had AT&T and just got tired of their customer non-service.

https://www.t-mobile.com/coverage/coverage-map

Contact ActionTek and ask them if the modem/gateway could have problems causing the DSL to drop and not fail on the (VOIP?) voice line. VOIP is not part of ActionTek eqpt (per its specs).

Also ask Centurylink if you have VOIP. IMO, you do not have VOIP.

Your max DSL speed is 7mb (per the modem specs). My old Cisco had a top speed of 8mb (via DSL). It is likely you do not have VOIP, but you should specifically ask in order to get it clarified.

"If critters have nibbled the outside cable, wouldn’t the phone as well as DSL be affected?

I’m still trying to contact Tech Service. Wasted all of yesterday with no success." - WendyBG


Okay, I'm gonna turn off my filter just a lil, :)

In my Sheriff Taylor's voice, "Aunt Bee, just call the man!"

At this point, you are wasting your time. If it were me, I would call and have them open a trouble ticket, advise them that you believe the service drop to your house has been damaged and to please send a service crew out to fix and or replace. By doing this, whatever the problem is, it will be fixed by a crew of trained professionals on your property, and they will not leave until it is fixed.

Troy
Please report back when they are coming out and what they ended up finding to be the problem.
3 Likes

Weather and various Internet connection types (cable, DSL, 5G Internet, etc):

https://www.cnet.com/home/internet/how-likely-is-bad-weather…

Today I have fiber = switched to it because Dish was having a rebroadcast fight with the local NBC channel. 9 months without access to Meet The Press, NBC new and the likely hood of not seeing the Super Bowl was enough.

And with regard to the weather - it is a red herring. In 12 years of DirecTV and Dish satellite service I never lost service for a period of time longer than 10 minutes. Now did loose service once for a period of 4 days because power lines went down.

And with regard to the weather - it is a red herring. In 12 years of DirecTV and Dish satellite service I never lost service for a period of time longer than 10 minutes.

That depends on how severe the weather in question is.

Seattle area, and the intensity of precipitation routinely encountered in a straight line between there and the satellites… meh. Actually, all those weather-related outages that supposedly plague satellite-tv STOPPED when we switched from cable to satellite. (Yes, we had outages because of rain while on cable.)

Montana… we’ve had some thunder&rain-storms that disrupted satellite reception.

I suppose that if you’re down south and trying to “shoot” the satellite straight through a hurricane, that might not work so well - but can’t speak from experience on that one.

Oh, and if you’re really trying to watch a show, a 10-minute disruption is a problem. And if it’s actually twenty thirty-second disruptions spread across 15 minutes, that’s probably worse.

And with regard to the weather - it is a red herring. In 12 years of DirecTV and Dish satellite service I never lost service for a period of time longer than 10 minutes.

I have lost service for more than 10 minutes multiple times.

PSU

Ditto. Thunderstorms and snowstorms; might as well switch to a DVD or other recorded source as there is no service until the storm passes. Can be, usually, a lot longer than 10 minutes. Blah, 10 minutes, I spit on your ten-minute storms out here in the flatlands where we have big weather events.

glh

< Olympic Peninsula is one of the beautiful places. I suspect my suggestion won’t work – but maybe. T-Mobile - the Cellphone folks are hitting the country with 5G Wireless internet service. This is less than a year old. Map below shows their cell service and it does include most of the peninsula’s population - places like Forks and Sequim.>

Thank you for the suggestion. I looked at the T-Mobile map. It covers my address with “5G Extended Range.” I phoned T-Mobile and talked with a sales person for quite a while. She said that we would need a “hot spot” which is a wireless modem-router that picks up the signal.

DH says that it won’t work for us because we are surrounded by trees that would block the line of sight. I would like to try it expeimentally but there would be start-up costs – a $35 connection fee, $50 per month service and a “hot spot” rental of $15. (If it works, I could buy the “hot spot” for $350.)

DH says the reception could be improved with an active antenna but the hot spot does not have a connection port for an antenna. Some bloggers have discussed disassembling their T-Mobile hot spot and intalling an antenna but I wouldn’t want to do that.

Someone on my road with trees says that they are using T-Mobile.

What do you think I should do?
Wendy

They are coming out in 2 weeks.

I never did get through to Tech Service over the phone though I waited on hold for hours and also asked them to text my cell phone. The Facebook CenturyLink customer service rep set the appointment up for me after I IM’d him in total frustration.

Wendy

“DH says that it won’t work for us because we are surrounded by trees that would block the line of sight. I would like to try it expeimentally but there would be start-up costs – a $35 connection fee, $50 per month service and a “hot spot” rental of $15. (If it works, I could buy the “hot spot” for $350.)”

I’ll chime in on this one. We had Verizon DSL (and before that HughesNet Satellite Internet… ugh) for a few years. We now have a point to point Microwave antenna on our roof for 10x the speed of DSL. Each time we’ve moved (HughesNet → AT&T Hotspot → DSL → Microwave), for a month or so, we left the old service in place, but unplugged. This allows for an easy resumption of service if the new one doesn’t work. If CenturyLink is anything like Verizon (they could be cousins from the stories I’ve heard and experienced), it’s A LOT easier to do that than to try to get them to come and setup new service again if you cancel. For us, it was worth the extra month’s bill as a small insurance policy, especially for the DSL move. I am convinced Verizon is intentionally neglecting their copper infrastructure and trying to get rid of DSL customers. It took 3-4 years to get them to connect us to DSL because “we don’t have any free ports at the moment, try again some other time”.

Anyways, all that to say, don’t cancel the old too soon, just in case.

Also, from the various people I’ve talked with (communications professionals), they’ve all recommended Wilson Amplifiers if you want to go the active antenna route.

https://www.wilsonamplifiers.com/home

Phaz

1 Like

In theory and with a good compass, deciding which tree to drop/top to open a line-of-sight to the correct geosynchronous satellite could be figured out. Choose the wrong tree and your spouse will hate you, though. Tree sway during ‘nasty weather’ could cause outages and jumpy signals.
Simplest would be to get a brand-new modem/router for the system you got already. New is so much better with multi-tasking than older modem/routers especially if there are a bunch of gadgets that the router connects with. How many phones and such does it deal with besides a computer?

1 Like

DH says that it won’t work for us because we are surrounded by trees that would block the line of sight. I would like to try it expeimentally but there would be start-up costs – a $35 connection fee, $50 per month service and a “hot spot” rental of $15. (If it works, I could buy the “hot spot” for $350.)

DH says the reception could be improved with an active antenna but the hot spot does not have a connection port for an antenna. - WendyBG


Instead of a hot spot, you could consider an amplifier.

I live way out in the country, one a two lane blacktop road in a heavily wooded area (literally within the Sam Houston National Forest). There is barely any cell signal at all but I have been using a Wilson Cell signal amplifier for about six years and it works without any line of sight dependency. It gets down to how much signal you have in the first place. Any amplifier can only amplify whatever signal is already there so it really depends on this factor most of all. I downloaded a cell signal analyzer for my phone to see what I had to work with.

The system consists of an Outdoor Yagi Directional Antennae, mounted on a six foot post and pointed at the Verizon tower about three miles away through heavily wooded terrain. A 75 Ohm cable is routed indoors to the amplifier which must be near AC power. From amplifier, there is another 75 Ohm cable that runs to indoor antennae which can be either a dome or a flat panel depending on the shape of the area you want to cover. I went with flat panel.

Wilson is a solid brand name, commercial quality, better than the cheap stuff sold by cell providers or discounters. My system cost $1,500 IIRC six years ago. I see that my model has been discontinued and it is clearance priced for $1,200. A new model is available that replaces the one I have.

https://www.wilsonamplifiers.com/wilson-pro-70-plus-75-ohm-c…

3 Likes

They are coming out in 2 weeks.

That is an outrage.

1 Like