OT Just sharing a Middle English version of "Running Up That Hill" because it's cool and

for all you still working stiffs, it’s Monday.

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at some point English changes to streamline the sound of the language. It was a process. I do not know when.

You are and we are derives were

I am and it is as derives was
A is derived as

I am derives is

he is derives has
he was derives had from the ‘ed’ past tense

who, where, when, and why use the w and h of past tense and he.

etc…the language of modern English is constructed.

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Each invader changed the language. I laff every time I watch “Ivanhoe”, about the Normans oppressing the poor Saxons. The Saxons were invaders too. I haven’t seen “Alfred the Great” in decades. That one was about invasion by the Danes.

Steve

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I do not know German well enough to know when that language group altered English to what we have today.

I do not know German well enough to know when that language group altered English to what we have today.

The Saxons moved in after the Roman withdrawal in the early 400s. A coalition of Vikings moved in in 865. The Danes moved in around 1000. The Normans moved in in 1066.

Steve…both Saxon and Norman lineage

I come from two long lines of peasants, Irish and Jewish. The parties are fantastic.

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If you want to do a deep dive into English, I highly recommend this podcast.

https://historyofenglishpodcast.com/episodes/

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Beautiful song, and eerily renewed feel in old English.

As to invaders, well, my middle name, “Treloar” meaning “protected garden”, is from Kernewek, the ancient Celtic language of Cornwall, and from the Romans on everybody has been invaders…

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Singing in near-dead languages was a thing some time back.

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