OT: Nordic Walking

We use hiking sticks often when we are on long walks in the woods or on rough trails but maybe we’ll start using them all the time.

https://www.livescience.com/what-is-nordic-walking
Nordic walking has been adapted to be a more inclusive form of body conditioning.

“You’re getting the same workout as if you were swimming,” says Stewart. “In that it works all major muscles. It’s also far more ergonomic than running, taking the weight off your joints but also engaging the upper body.”

How can you master the art of Nordic walking? “It’s all about swinging arm from shoulder and planting your poles at an angle to get forward propulsion," says Stewart.

According to the Journal of Physical Therapy Science (opens in new tab), it is believed that the primary purpose of using a pole is to be able to utilize the upper limb muscles, which are not normally used in walking, to “facilitate high-intensity exercise with the minimum effort by adjusting the energy consumption of the body”. It’s for this reason that Nordic walking is sometimes described as having the intensity of running without the high impact.

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“We use hiking sticks often when we are on long walks in the woods or on rough trails but maybe we’ll start using them all the time.”

I’m into nordic skiing, and nordic walking is a start of the off-season training item. Stride with poles, making a longer stride than regular walking, and not landing on the toes. The next item in the progression is called “moose hoofing”, use poles and find a good long uphill, and while going at an easy pace, do a little hop ( get a little air ) while jogging up. After than, hill bounding uses poles, on a challenging uphill, and is a fast but sustainable run with a hard pushoff from each leg, that gets a little air. It sucks the life right out of you, in a good way.

The World Cup and national nordic skiers are some of the very best athletes in the world, as far as I
know the highest tested VO2-max was recorded by nordic skiers ( not certain if still true, was a couple of years ago when I read that ). On your own level, if you emulate their training, it will benefit you no matter what human powered sport you’re into.

I belong to CXC Academy, they got training plans to follow that will test you, lol.
https://cxcacademy.com/

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I got one of these Nordic Track cross country skiing machines set up in the living room, but I rarely use it since prefer to walk at a brisk pace outside.

https://www.nordictrack.com/skiers/nordictrack-classic-pro-s…

But man, if you were doing 10K a day on the NordicTrack, you’d live forever.

intercst

But man, if you were doing 10K a day on the NordicTrack, you’d live forever.

You might.

I’d probably keel over on day 3.

:slight_smile:

AW

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Thanks for posting this interesting article. I used to be a cross country and downhill skier in my younger days. The cross country use of poles for walking comes naturally to me, and I have been using poles for my daily walks for more than 10 years. It sure does help with my lower back problems and my posture at my ripe old age of 79.

Jaak