Pepsi hits the trip wire

Enough with the price increases. Carrefour drops all Pepsi products, including chips and snacks because … they’re raising prices too much, too fast.

‘Bout time.

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On a recent trip to the deodorant aisle and bar soap aisle I found Proctor & Gamble prices highest on the shelf at Walmart. I decided to try other brands.

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Deodorant has become absurdly expensive. The cans I bought for $3.99 (minus $0.50 or $1.00 coupon sometimes) are now $7.99 or $8.99 and I haven’t seen a good coupon in a long time.

And soda [pop] is way way way up there. As soon as the typical prices passed $1.50/2l bottle, I stopped buying all the name brands and only buy store brands now, And you know what? They taste almost the same and are good enough for the occasions we drink soda. And even those are going up, my local supermarket had them at $1 per bottle for a long time and just raised them to $1.25.

It’s time for consumers to simply refuse to buy some of this overpriced stuff. At least for a while.

Oh, and BLEACH … it used to be dirt cheap, a buck a gallon for the cheap brands, maybe 3 bucks for the fancy name brands. Now even the cheapest walmart brand is $6 AND they lowered the size to 121 oz.

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Big pools have become the new McMansions, and they need lots of Chlorine = Bleach. And some other issues as well.

Very slightly salt water is enormously easier to keep clean and sanitarily safe than what almost everyone does instead, but the pool boy “industry” is extremely traditional and mostly ignorant.

david fb
(used to make lotsa pool boy money during summer)

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Lots and lots of people are changing their pools over to salt systems. It’s one of those rare things that’s all advantages and no disadvantages that I can see. The water is more “comfortable”, better for the skin, way way way better for the hair, especially blonde hair. It stays cleaner all the time. It is less expensive overall. Much fewer chemicals to haul around. Better for the earth. I changed our pool to a salt system in 2006, but it is in disrepair right now and needs to be replaced. Nobody uses the pool anyway so I am procrastinating.

The number of pools down here hasn’t changed much in the last 10 years, but the price of bleach has more than quintupled.

In another thread recently, I commented that I never use Tide, because of the exorbitant price, and I’m a P&G shareholder.

Never pay full boat for pop (soda) either. At BK and Arby’s, a senior pop is 50 cents, with free refills. At the local Wendy’s, a senior pop is free. A usual meal will be a sandwich of some sort, and a geezer pop. Cheaper than a “combo”, and without the salt and grease of the fries. Only time I have fries is when I have a coupon that makes a combo cheaper.

Steve

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We have a salt water pool, the only disadvantage, harder on the pump. Otherwise, love it. Way much easier on the skin/hair than chlorine.

I have a saltwater pool and the chlorinator has to be replaced every two or three years depending on usage. They cost over $1000 last I checked so one has to figure out what you would be spending on chlorine for 2 or 3 years to compare. Also, my pool guy recommends that I keep one puck in the skimmer all the time (gives off stabilizer and adds miniscule amount of chlorine to pool )so I don’t buy a lot of chlorine but I do buy a little. I love the clean smell of this pool and it does make you skin feel great…doc

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Interesting that chlorine prices are soaring, yet look at Clorox (CLX)…only $20 above its three year low and $50 below its three year high…and is still way below it’s 30-year average CAGR (includes dividends):

BMW Method Screen Results for CLX (kleinnet.com)
Murph
(who has been eyeballing CLX)

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Seems that anyone that made cleaning/sanitizing products, like Clorox, would have been bid way, way, up, during the plague. So, measuring return since 2020 is about as accurate as measuring stock market return since the bottom of the recession in the early 80s. Actually, CLX might be approaching a buy point. It is slightly below where it was before the plague, as the excess demand and price gouging is unwound.

Steve

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If chlorine prices are soaring it could be time to look at Olin. They bought Dow Chemicals chlorine business. Chlorine and caustic soda are co-products made by electrolysis of salt water. Prices change routinely to keep them in balance. Most chlorine is used to make vinyl PVC. So tied to new car sales and housing starts. Recovering economy should be good for Olin.

Clorox is mostly domestic. Unlike competitors they don’t have much international sales–a growth segment for many.

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Completely understand the COVID sales bump and decline, but that factor should be out of the way by now (i.e. soaring chlorine prices), yet the CLX earnings for the quarter ending 1/31/24 are estimated to be $1.11…below same quarter 2023 by 6% ( $1.18 versus $1.11).

Guess we will find out later this month.

Cheers!
Murph
(who also notes that the quarterly dividend has been $1.20 for the past three quarters, with earnings of $.49, $1.67 and $1.51-average of $1.22)

Well, the number reported on MSN, for Dec 22 is .98 vs an estimate of .65 and estimate for Dec 23, $1.11. as you said. Their record over “the wise” over the last four quarters are beat by 0.33. 0.29. 0.49 and 0.71.

Earnings estimate for all of 24 is $4.63 vs $5.09 for 23, and $5.96 for 25.

On the other hand, the other thing I look at, equity, to see if they are making it, or faking it, tells a different story. Equity at June 2020 was $900 M. As of Sept 23. they had Welched that to a negative $37M, without making a dent in debt.

Steve

The biggest thing that sticks out to me is their debt: online brokerage shows total debt/total capital at 95.57%…very high versus their sector/industry average of 55.19%.

Looks like they have been incurring debt to continue their dividend streak, among other things. Not normally a good move, given what became a higher interest rate environment.

Looks like I need to do more in-depth research before taking any position in CLX.

Cheers!
Murph

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The one I had installed (Poolpilot brand) had a removable chlorinator that was easily cleaned with a bucket of vinegar. First one lasted over 8 years, second one lasted similarly long, now on third one, but main system is out of commission for now and the whole thing needs to be replaced.

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MarkR

I clean mine with dilute muriatic acid, but in this Texas season running 12 months they don’t last as long as other places and they recommend monthly cleanings. I forget the major brand one that i have. I actually replaced the electrical box part of this myself instead of paying a pool guy. It was quite easy fyi. Everything was on youtube…doc

Pro tip: order the fries with no salt or low salt and you get yours from a fresh batch.
LBYM: buy bleach at the Dollar store (or similar)

Mike

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Yep, Muriatic Acid was recommended, but I perused some pool forums and the conclusion was that vinegar works just as good and the cells last a lot longer. I think I used muriatic acid once and then switched to vinegar. The trick with vinegar is to simply let it soak in the liquid for longer. Season here is also 12 months. Nobody “winterizes” their pools here LOL.

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For Clorox? As of the September quarter, their debt load is over 100%: net debt of $2.3B and equity of a negative $37M But that is the Welchian thing to do now. Just ask Boeing: net debt of over $45B, and equity of a negative $16B. Because it’s all about making the “JC” richer, not about strengthening the company for the long run.

Steve