You’re not imagining it —

You’re not imagining it — package sizes are shrinking

It’s the inflation you’re not supposed to see.

From toilet paper to yogurt and coffee to corn chips, manufacturers are quietly shrinking package sizes without lowering prices. It’s dubbed “shrinkflation,” and it’s accelerating worldwide.

In the U.S., a small box of Kleenex now has 60 tissues; a few months ago, it had 65. Chobani Flips yogurts have shrunk from 5.3 ounces to 4.5 ounces. In the U.K., Nestle slimmed down its Nescafe Azera Americano coffee tins from 100 grams to 90 grams.

Shrinkflation isn’t new, experts say. But it proliferates in times of high inflation as companies grapple with rising costs for ingredients, packaging, labor and transportation.

Global consumer price inflation was up an estimated 7% in May, a pace that will likely continue through September, according to S&P Global.

https://apnews.com/article/india-prices-business-d2c8279d39e…

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That has been going on for a long time. A “half gallon” of ice cream from the major brands is now 1.5 quarts. The bag of nachos has shrunk from 16oz to 12oz. I noticed, some years ago, how tiny yogurt containers look now. I was right. A cup of Danon or Yoplat used to be 8 ounces. Then it was 6. Now it’s 5.3.

Eventually, we can look forward to paying for packaging and handling, and getting no product at all.
/sarcasm

Steve

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I’m surprised that the junk food companies don’t try to spin their smaller portion sizes as healthier and lower in calories.

Been happening for years.

The 5 and 10 cent stores are now 99 cent AND UP stores. This has been happening for a while and I’m wondering what we need to continue to mint pennies, nickels and dimes for?

Jeff

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The 5 and 10 cent stores are now 99 cent AND UP stores. This has been happening for a while and I’m wondering what we need to continue to mint pennies, nickels and dimes for?

I posed this question a while back and the thing I came up with was it’s the taxes on the goods, rather than the prices of the goods themselves, that still make smaller coins necessary. That said, I can’t remember the last time I used cash for a purchase, and coins are not necessary for credit/debit card purchases. There are still people who use cash, however. Many.

Ip

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Eventually, we can look forward to paying for packaging and handling, and getting no product at all.

Isn’t that what we’re already doing with the single-serve bags of chips?

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The 5 and 10 cent stores are now 99 cent AND UP stores. This has been happening for a while and I’m wondering what we need to continue to mint pennies, nickels and dimes for?

We know how people will howl if any denomination is discontinued. They will be sure it is some “big gummit” conspiracy to cheat them.

With tongue firmly in cheek, I have offered the banana republic solution: redenomination, change old money for new at a 10 for 1 ratio. That way, people would not have to learn anything, and prices would go back to “the good old days” of fifty years ago. People are sufficiently innumerate to not realize their pay would also go back to the “good old days” when $12,000/yr was pretty good money, until after the redenomination is done.

Steve

Unintended consequence? Maybe shrinkflation will help address our societal obesity problem. If it does, it’s worth the extra cost.

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Maybe shrinkflation will help address our societal obesity problem.

Not likely when fast food joints are passing out a “small” soft drink that matches the “large” from when I was growing up, and today’s “large” is bigger than a Speedway Big Gulp.

Isn’t that what we’re already doing with the single-serve bags of chips?

It would be interesting to do an analysis of the portion of retail price that goes to packaging and handling, vs product, for each size of package. I would expect that, as package size is reduced, the percentage of the price that goes to other than the product contained, increases. I don’t know if it’s one of those “intrusive, burdensome, big gummit, regulations”, but the grocery store I shop in has unit pricing on the shelf price tag, and, yes, the biggest box of Cheerios has the lowest cost per ounce of product contained. I would like to see a similar analysis for the old half gallon of Hudsonville ice cream, vs the 1.75 quart that followed that, vs the 1.5 quart container they offer now.

Speaking of ice cream, I have noticed a price inversion at the store. Breyer’s, which used to be good, is now pretty poor quality. If you look closely at various flavors of Breyer’s, you will see some are marked as “frozen dairy dessert”, because they no longer contain enough milk products to meet the minimum “intrusive, burdensome, big gummit, standards” to even be called “ice cream”.

At the store I shop at, Hudsonville and Stroh’s are much better quality than Breyer’s.

Recent pricing: Breyer’s $4.79, Hudsonville $4.59. Stroh’s $4.29. The worst excuse for ice cream, with the best know label on it, is the most expensive.

Is Your Favorite Ice Cream Posing As Something Else?

“I brought it home and I served it to a couple of family members, who immediately said something is wrong with this product,” Bach said.

After reading the label, Bach noticed the words “frozen dairy dessert,” not “ice cream” like the container used to say.

Butter pecan and other popular Breyers flavors like cookies & cream, chocolate chip cookie dough and rocky road are now called frozen dairy dessert. The change in name is because Breyers changed the ingredients and legally they can no longer call their product ice cream.

https://www.cbsnews.com/pittsburgh/news/is-your-favorite-ice…

The Meijer store brand plonk is the same as Breyer’s, full of thickeners and fillers, and it costs a lot less than Breyer’s.

But, at my age, I can afford to get real ice cream, even if it costs less than Breyer’s plonk.

Steve

I’m wondering what we need to continue to mint pennies, nickels and dimes for?

Check with our Canadian Tim for details about Canadian pennies.

IIRC he reported Canada got rid of their Canadian pennies awhile back:

Production of the penny ceased in May 2012,

[1] and the Royal Canadian Mint ceased distribution of them as of February 4, 2013.

[2] However, the coin remains legal tender.

[3] Nevertheless, once distribution of the coin ceased, vendors were no longer expected to return pennies as change for cash purchases, and were encouraged to round purchases to the nearest five cents.

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Penny_(Canadian_coin)#:~:text=….