4 questions for retirees

Is the recent drawdown in stocks affecting your day to day living spending?

Anybody second guessing their retirement investing strategy/risk tolerance?

Are you planning on making any significant changes or just keeping course?

How is your mental health/emotions regarding your finances doing?

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No - Not much more to cut out. Pension, SS, and PT job cover all expenses.

No - This too shall pass and, besides, we are still considerably higher than March of 2020

No - Once a bottom is reached, I will probably increase the equity weight

Good - Have mentally prepared for this for a year and believe it will pass fairly quickly.

Hope everyone else is managing as well.

PW

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Darrellquock asked:

Is the recent drawdown in stocks affecting your day to day living spending? A, no, I have sufficient cash to last 5 years of withdrawals from my retirement account, so (at least philosophically) I can continue with my growth sleeve investing.

Anybody second guessing their retirement investing strategy/risk tolerance? A. Not really, always emotional when big retreats happen, but history show wisdom of developing an plan and sticking with that plan.

Are you planning on making any significant changes or just keeping course? A. I have reduced the growth sleeve of my account, rather, the market reduced the allocation for me. I’m actually looking to (and to an extent have already begun) leveraging funds back into that sleeve. I’m careful to stay within the target allocations to cash.

How is your mental health/emotions regarding your finances doing? A. In a Bear market, my mood is generally not a good as when I’m in a Bull market. Don’t think I need therapy yet…

5

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“Is the recent drawdown in stocks affecting your day to day living spending?”

No

“Anybody second guessing their retirement investing strategy/risk tolerance?”

No. My IRA is 50/50 bonds-REITS v Stocks. Rest is 70/30 stocks/bonds or REITS

“Are you planning on making any significant changes or just keeping course?”

No.

“How is your mental health/emotions regarding your finances doing?”

Just fine, thank you I’m not on a shoe-string budget.

The market goes up - the market goes down. As always. Been through half a dozen ‘corrections’ and ‘recessions’ and didn’t waver.

t.

It is important to remember that Corrections happen about two years (and sometimes with double/triple dips), and if you are not allocated in a manner that allows for, or protects from such, then you are probably not correctly invested; period.

The last 17 Corrections (and the Covid Bear Market) - over the last 10 years (not counting the most recent)
https://www.nbcnews.com/news/us-news/what-s-market-correctio…

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You are supposed to have a diversified portfolio that can tolerate a few bumps in the road. No change in my strategy. Hoping for a bottom one of the days.

No financial changes at my house. Just minor adjustments.

The emotional part of a down market is the tough part. I’d rather go on vacation. Wake me when its over.

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Is the recent drawdown in stocks affecting your day to day living spending?

Absolutely not. My wife wouldn’t let me spend anything before the drawdown and I can’t spend any now.

Anybody second guessing their retirement investing strategy/risk tolerance?

Absolutely not.

Are you planning on making any significant changes or just keeping course?

I’m am looking for buying opportunities. Otherwise, not.

How is your mental health/emotions regarding your finances doing?

Just fine, thank you. Maybe I’ve just too many of these crazy market moves to be concerned at the moment.

AW

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#1-3 all no. We have diversified income streams from 3 different sources (not old enough for SS yet) and none are dependent on stock market returns (capital gains). So as long as the dividends flow and rental income keeps getting deposited, life is good.

#4 more worried about the weather keeping us from getting out an doing things than anything else. Including COVID.

JLC

Is the recent drawdown in stocks affecting your day to day living spending?
No. We have essentially been out of the market since late 2019. 90% Cash
But I don’t like the rate of inflation that we have and it looks like it won’t be abating soon - That, I don’t like.

Anybody second guessing their retirement investing strategy/risk tolerance?
Not right now!

Are you planning on making any significant changes or just keeping course?
I’ll be buying soon… as soon as the market get to a more normal valuation

How is your mental health/emotions regarding your finances doing?
My mental health is good - but I’m not sure my DW would agree :wink:

'38Packard

Is the recent drawdown in stocks affecting your day to day living spending?
Anybody second guessing their retirement investing strategy/risk tolerance?
Are you planning on making any significant changes or just keeping course?
How is your mental health/emotions regarding your finances doing?

-No. I have stock market ups & downs baked into my plan. I have extra cash, iBond ETF and less volatility stuff acting as a “bond tent” to mitigate the problem of “sequence of return risk,” that is, a drop a few years before or after retirement date.
-No, I believed in the plan I made beforehand and nothing changed. I didn’t count on continuous >12% returns annually.
-No, stock market volatility is baked into my plan. Return of inflation in there as well. I may have worked a year longer than I had to, but I’ll only know that in many years. If this stock market drop causes you to “sell low” because of fear, you had too much in stocks (or the wrong mix of stocks, like all tech rather than dividend stocks or broad market indexes).
-Just fine. I have been through 45% and 50% drawdowns when I was 95% in stocks. This drawdown is pretty minor (so far). Can anybody possibly have thought we wouldn’t have a 14% drop in the SP500? Or, did someone imagine he’d be a lot more even-keeled than actually happened?

If the stock market seems “really really low” to someone right now, it’s a great time to convert some IRA money to a Roth–better to pay taxes on the low amount converted than those same shares when they come back.

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<wakes up, rubs sleep from eyes…>

What? You been looking at portfolio in a downturn? Strange. I take a nap.

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Is the recent drawdown in stocks affecting your day to day living spending?

No. I don’t spend all of my income from pensions, Social Security, and VA Disability Compensation.

Anybody second guessing their retirement investing strategy/risk tolerance?

I’m not. My investment strategy has survived all of the major downturns since 1999.

Are you planning on making any significant changes or just keeping course?

No. I’m only down about $500K since 03 January 2022.

How is your mental health/emotions regarding your finances doing?

Finance isn’t something to be emotional about.

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" Is the recent drawdown in stocks affecting your day to day living spending?"

No.

“Anybody second guessing their retirement investing strategy/risk tolerance?”

Continuously.

“Are you planning on making any significant changes or just keeping course?”

Have bought a few “oddity” companies to replace a utility and a packaging company I sold
in January. Bought a company involved in electric bus manufacturing who has contracted to
supply electric motors to a truck manufacturer - Proterra

https://www.proterra.com/

Bought a company involved in salty snacks - that I craved as a child a long long time ago - Utz
Brands (yes - I do not expect this will end well)

https://www.utzsnacks.com/

Bought a Canadian/global cannabis-focused consumer packaged goods company - Tilray

https://www.tilray.com/

And finally bought a water treatment firm - Evoqua Water Tech. - which is in the industry I
used to work in and around

https://www.evoqua.com/

"How is your mental health/emotions regarding your finances doing? "

Mental health - always questionable
emotions - happy

finances - Okie Dokie

Howie52

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no, no, no, just fine

c.

No changes here. For people new to this, it’s jarring and they want to run for the hills, after a few decade, or more, you see the ebbs and flows and also learn valuable lessons about investment temperment and also, tempered stock investments……it’s not gambling like at Las Vegas.

For example, I’ve been going through old investment papers and see I deviated from my investment philosophy and got up in the madness of crowds, and became over confident in my ability because it seems like everything I invested went up, and up, and up! Yep, I learned from that, mighty painful lessons but I’m glad I learned from it and I hadn’t bet the whole house on those things, just a bit, but enough to have carry over losses on my tax returns a few plus years. You either learn from your mistakes or you go broke.

Be careful of your emotions. But also know what you are investing in and why.

Lucky always learning Dog

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For us, it’s no, no, no, and no, but I would expect to see those answers on this board given its make-up.
That said, my Dad remembers living through the 1929 crash and how people lost so much money. He talks about them having to move back in with his grandparents and having to build back after the Depression. When he calls me, he is always asking if I have a lot of cash and to make sure that everything is not in the market. He never invested in stocks because my mother was terrified of the market after the 1929 crash, but he knows that my brother and I have always invested and have a lot in the market. There aren’t a lot of folks his age left who lived through the market, but I would not be surprised to see those folks react differently to today’s market gyrations given their personal experiences.

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"Is the recent drawdown in stocks affecting your day to day living spending?

Anybody second guessing their retirement investing strategy/risk tolerance?

Are you planning on making any significant changes or just keeping course?

How is your mental health/emotions regarding your finances doing? "


Folks from the Ukraine may answer with a different perspective - as perhaps would the families of
Russian soldiers invading their neighbor.

Folks in Taiwan may also be wondering more “imaginatively” - as perhaps investors in companies
that depend upon chip availability in addition to firms involved in logistics.

Howie52
Alas Babylon?

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Is the recent drawdown in stocks affecting your day to day living spending?

There was a drawdown in stocks? I hadn’t noticed. Haven’t checked my portfolio in a couple of months.

Anybody second guessing their retirement investing strategy/risk tolerance?

No. Because I hadn’t noticed any significant change in stocks. Maybe I should look at them. Probably won’t, though.

Are you planning on making any significant changes or just keeping course?

Seeing as I just found out about this horrible turn of events, I haven’t had time to make any plans. Then again, I don’t see anything ahead that I hadn’t planned for already. [looks at a stock index chart] You mean the drop over the last couple of months?? Stocks dropping 10% - 20% over the course of a few months is such a common occurrence that it’s part of planning from the outset. This isn’t unusual. It’s like taking a ship through the North Atlantic and seeing an iceberg. Where you’re going, there are going to be icebergs. It’s part of your planning from the get-go.

How is your mental health…?

Could be better. Still dealing with the passing of my wife. That sucks, big time. Sucks way more than a few wiggles downward in a stock chart.

–Peter

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I wasn’t going to weigh in on this topic because, as others have noted, we on this board are not young, not inexperienced, less likely to overreact, etc.

But one perspective that I’ve not seen expressed is one of excitement? A long and irrational bull market is a great thing for discerning changes in the fundamental landscape. There may be a paradigm shift in how companies are valued, perhaps favoring crazy top-line growth and relevant new technologies over companies that simply churn out future cash flow.

We are personally at the front end of retirement. We have a 30+ year time line (glide path to ashes) that we are planning for so we still need to be 20-40% in the market (20% now, when the market is insane).

So what’s this “excitement?”
Point 1- the market is not rational, in a traditional sense.
Point 2- the math tells us we will eventually have a reversion to the mean.
Point 3- that will make for some screaming bargains
Point 4- and the opportunity to buy stocks that will go to the moon (exciting) or bust (that part does not excite me so much…).

Paying close attention now to companies like ZS, or even TSLA, allows us to target a traditional “value” entry point, into these disruptive and important companies that are valued like money grows on trees (which is true; one need only look at M3 money supply over the past couple of years…just like 2005-8).

As macro-economic consequences finally come to bear on the markets (whether it likes it or not) there will be a repeat of all of the other wicked gut-wrenching reversions. Paper fortunes will be lost, probably a lot of younger newer investors will be so burned that they’ll be reticent to get back in (except through company 401ks, when they finally find a job), and for 10-25 years or so, everything should look more normal.

To put a personal point on it; we are 401k millionaires. Unfortunately, that brand of millionaire does not allow us to act like millionaires…no private jets or weekend jaunts to the family island off St Barts…or even the Hamptons (ick…sorry if you feel otherwise). A 20% bump-up in assets in the nest egg is quite a big thing; a hedge against serious illness in an out of control health system, say.

So one more shot at being brave when others are fearful is exciting. This time I have 40+ years of experience to guide me to better decisions than youthful optimism and chutzpah ever allowed. It could be as simple as buying ARKK if/when it gets forced to $30 (or whatever).

Exciting.

-Randy
(but still only 20-40%)

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Is the recent drawdown in stocks affecting your day to day living spending?

No, don’t actually retire until 3/25: We will see how long it lasts this time.
But today I sold XLE and XME, that combined with some shorts I put to take some risk off the table for DW’s TSP in the C-fund have meant it really has not been to bad a downturn. Plus the added bonus that last month I pulled my 401(k) out of my employer evil grasp which resulted in liquidation out of the market and sits as a check headed over to FIDO.

Anybody second guessing their retirement investing strategy/risk tolerance?

Given the above: Hell ya!!
The amount I had in XLE (Energy) and XME (mining) were stretch inflation plays for me, thinking Mr. Powell fails to gain (the illusion of) control over rates- whew. Having the 401(k) in a check versus a rather large check in financials (worked at a bank so company stock) and where I had the small/mid cap portion or the portfolio was just luck - double whew. So, given that, strategy and risk tolerance (will mention a little chunk of crypto too!!) might be changing.

Are you planning on making any significant changes or just keeping course?

As I think about above?? or NO CHANGES?? That is the fun of second guessing, we’ll see.

How is your mental health/emotions regarding your finances doing?

Probably about the same as anyone who announces retirement and then the market drops 10% over the next couple weeks. But all of that is really small potatoes given the cause of the drop and the fact that some folks lost things more valuable than money! I mean - right now with <2% unemployment in the local economy - pretty sure this boomer can snag some gig to keep the puppies in kibbles. Some folks it is going to take a lot more to get back on track - some never will.

d(sanity)/dT