Australia 2030 goal

Australia signs new carbon emissions target
www.bbc.com/news/world-australia-61822046
“Australian Prime Minister Anthony Albanese has announced more ambitious climate targets for his country. He has pledged to cut carbon emissions by 43% from 2005 levels by 2030, up from the previous conservative government’s target of between 26% and 28%.”

Australia is currently about 5% below their 2005 levels, so the new target represents a decrease of 40%. This would require a decrease of 5.5% per year. For comparison, global emissions dropped 6% in 2020 and the Soviet Union saw about a 5% reduction when it collapsed.

DB2

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Australia is currently about 5% below their 2005 levels, so the new target represents a decrease of 40%. This would require a decrease of 5.5% per year.

Highly doubtful they will be able to make those kind of changes over several years.

As I always say, it is easy to make goals. Anybody can make a new goal. The difficult part is actually doing what is necessary to make those goals a reality. When the implementation of those changes causes people to become inconvenienced, such as with large energy price increases, or significantly increased outages, then the people will push back.

  • Pete
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Australia is currently about 5% below their 2005 levels, so the new target represents a decrease of 40%. This would require a decrease of 5.5% per year.
DB2

I don’t see those words in the BBC link provided, so I assume the numbers are from DB2’s research?

Questions: Where did you get this information? Are we talking about total greenhouse gas emissions? CO2 emissions from energy? CO2 including cement manufacture? Land use changes? How recent is “currently”?

Australia’s performance varies greatly, depending on how these things are defined, which sectors are included, and perhaps most importantly, who is doing the reporting?

For instance, the Global Carbon Atlas shows Australia at 388 Mt CO2 for 2005. The latest year shown is 2020 and CO2 emissions were 392 Mt. That is a 1% increase, not the 5% decrease stated in the OP.

http://www.globalcarbonatlas.org/en/CO2-emissions

On the other hand, the following document from the government of Australia shows annual greenhouse gas emissions in 2005 at 616.6 MtCO2(e), while 2021 emissions were 494.2 Mt. That is a decrease of 20%.

Scroll down to Annual emissions data:
https://www.industry.gov.au/data-and-publications/national-g…

More questions than answers…

  • Pete
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Australia is currently about 5% below their 2005 levels, so the new target represents a decrease of 40%. This would require a decrease of 5.5% per year.

Where did you get this information?

The 5% below 2005 was pulled from a report by the Australian Department of Industry, Science, Energy and Resources.
www.industry.gov.au/data-and-publications/australias-emissio…
However, I could be misreading their Figure 2 for Mt CO2e.

DB2

Australian Prime Minister Anthony Albanese has announced more ambitious climate targets for his country. He has pledged to cut carbon emissions by 43% from 2005 levels by 2030, up from the previous conservative government’s target of between 26% and 28%.

This may be harder than they thought.

www.theguardian.com/australia-news/2022/jun/20/stakes-never-…
Coal- and gas-fired power plants could be paid to stay in business to bolster the stability of the main electricity grid and attract enough investment to build the equivalent of 50 times the original Snowy Hydro scheme by 2050, according to a high-level design paper released by the Energy Security Board.

The fossil fuel generators would be required even as Australia continues to decarbonise the electricity sector, the paper released on Monday said.

The report by the ESB backs payments for not just supplying power but also retaining the capacity to do so, as one of the most viable options to reform the faltering energy market after 2025.

DB2

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