Finland passes best climate target law

Finland has passed arguably the world’s most ambitious climate target into law. It aims to be the first developed country to reach net zero, in 2035, and net negative – absorbing more CO2 than it emits – by 2040.

The target was set based on analysis by a group of independent economists from the Finnish climate change panel. They worked out what Finland’s fair share was of the 420 GT of carbon dioxide that the world can emit and still have a two-thirds chance of limiting global warming to 1.5C.

Finland’s environment minister Emma Kari told Climate Home it was “very important” that the target was set with researchers and people from the climate science community. She added: “High income countries have to take a progressive and active role when it comes to tackling climate change.”

Russia’s invasion of Ukraine has sped up Finland’s energy transition, Kari added, as the government pushed ahead with wind power and making buildings more energy efficient and less reliant on fossil fuel heating.

The target will be met without relying on international carbon offsets, Kari said, where one country pays another to reduce emissions on its behalf.

https://www.climatechangenews.com/2022/05/31/finland-sets-wo…

Jaak

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Finland has passed arguably the world’s most ambitious climate target into law. It aims to be the first developed country to reach net zero, in 2035…

Ain’t gonna be easy.

www.euronews.com/green/2022/06/07/this-european-country-has-…
“The good news is that last year emissions decreased in the effort-sharing sector,” Kari adds, which covers the transport, agriculture, building and waste industries. To achieve a carbon-neutral Finland, the government aims to halve emissions from these sectors by 2030…

With vast ‘snow’ forests spanning 75% of the country, Finland has great natural advantages to help it on its way. Protecting these forests is key. New figures from Statistics Finland show that they turned from being overall carbon stores to emitters for the first time last year. This means they are releasing more CO2 through deforestation than the remaining trees could absorb.

DB2

With vast ‘snow’ forests spanning 75% of the country, Finland has great natural advantages to help it on its way. Protecting these forests is key. New figures from Statistics Finland show that they turned from being overall carbon stores to emitters for the first time last year. This means they are releasing more CO2 through deforestation than the remaining trees could absorb.

DB2

Then there is this.

**Nuclear power in Finland**
Overview of nuclear power in Finland

As of 2022, Finland has five operating nuclear reactors in two power plants, all located on the shores of the Baltic Sea, and provided about 35% of the country's electricity in 2019. The first research nuclear reactor in Finland was commissioned in 1962 and the first commercial reactor started operation in 1977. A fifth reactor is in the commissioning phase, having started producing electricity an... Wikipedia

Anymouse

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As of 2022, Finland has five operating nuclear reactors in two power plants, all located on the shores of the Baltic Sea, and provided about 35% of the country's electricity in 2019.

Finland’s newest nuclear plant at Olkiluoto has resumed testing operations, as it is now producing electricity. The plant was shut down for a time to inspect and repair a steam reheater in the non-nuclear section of the power plant.

https://www.world-nuclear-news.org/Articles/Test-operation-o…

The test production phase has resumed at the Olkiluoto 3 EPR in Finland following the completion of maintenance and repair activities in the plant’s turbine island. Operator Teollisuuden Voima Oyj (TVO) said the tests will now continue at a power level of 60%, increasing to 80% in mid-August and reaching full power in September.

Olkiluoto-3 is a big, French designed EPR. It will provide 12,000 GWh of electricity per year for the Finnish power system.

From the following, we see coal, oil and natural gas provided about 9,500 GWh of electricity in 2020.
https://www.iea.org/data-and-statistics/data-browser?country…

Therefore, Olkiluoto-3 should be able to allow the Finns to shut down or greatly reduce their fossil fuel consumption in the electricity sector. Finland still imports about 20% of its power from outside, so the new nuclear plant could also be used to reduce those imports.

There were plans for building another nuclear plant in the central part of Finland, but that plant was originally to be supplied by the Russians. The war in Ukraine put an end to that project. Instead, the Finnish authorities are looking at a smaller French design, which is currently in development.

https://www.world-nuclear-news.org/Articles/European-regulat…

France’s Nuward small modular reactor (SMR) design will be the case study for a European early joint regulatory review led by the French nuclear safety regulator with the participation of the Czech and Finnish nuclear regulators, EDF has announced.

The review - to be carried out by France’s Autorité de Sûreté Nucléaire (ASN), Finland’s Radiation and Nuclear Safety Authority (STUK) and the Czech State Office for Nuclear Safety (SÚJB) - will be based on the current set of national regulations from each country, the highest international safety objectives and reference levels, and up-to-date knowledge and relevant good practice, EDF noted.

  • Pete
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