OT: data mining

Taking a break from the war and nuclear holocaust for a moment.

Mosied over to the barber shop this afternoon. Noticed two computer printed notices on the door. One had store hours that diverged from the hours more permanently posted on the door: close at 3pm on Sunday. I arrived at 3:05.

The other notice is what this rant is about.

This barber shop has been trying to data mine customers for several years. In the past, I gave them a “harrumph, you don’t need my life story to cut my hair”, and got sheared without giving up all the information.

Now, two years into the plague, the shop (part of a large chain) has a new scam: the other computer printed notice on the door says words to the effect “to expedite covid contact tracing, you are required to give your name, address, and phone number. we cannot cut your hair without this information”.

Two years into the plague, they suddenly discover contact tracing? Bah! They are trying to get the personal info they have been trying to get out of me for years.

Steve…needs to find a new barber shop…there is one inside the grocery store

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I’m surprised you don’t cut your own hair with a shaver found in some dumpster behind a tuti-frutti store!

I bought a shaver at the beginning of “The Event” and have cut my own hair for two plus years - takes 5 minutes and saves me $20 a go.

And I was just starting to admire you!

JimA

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I’m surprised you don’t cut your own hair with a shaver found in some dumpster behind a tuti-frutti store!

Well, there’s the problem. No tuti-frutti stores around here.

I bought a shaver at the beginning of “The Event” and have cut my own hair for two plus years -

I inherited an electric clipper set from my mom a dozen years ago, but gave it to a coworker for grooming her dog. She posted on FB that her dog died a couple weeks ago. Maybe I could get the clippers back from her?

Steve

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steve203
This barber shop has been trying to data mine customers for several years. In the past, I gave them a “harrumph, you don’t need my life story to cut my hair”, and got sheared without giving up all the information.

Ranks right up there with why your fav employer, Radio Shack, asked for email addresses when a customer buys batteries. Eh?

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Radio Shack, asked for email addresses when a customer buys batteries. Eh?

In internal meetings with top management, they insisted the mailing list was not sold, it was exclusively for their monthly sale flyer. A few years before the lights went out, I saw an advert or a notice on their web site: they were no longer going to ask for names and addresses of their customers. The notice started out saying something like “the thing you hate about shopping at Radio Shack is going away”.

The two big grocery store chains that have a presence around here are Meijer and Kroger. I shop Meijer exclusively, because you don’t have to jump through hoops to get the advertised sale price on things. At Kroger, you can’t get the advertised price, unless you give up your personal information for their “shopper’s” card.

There used to be a third chain here, Farmer Jack. I would duck into the FJ occasionally, as one was very close to home. FJ had the same deal as Kroger, give up your personal information, or pay full boat for everything. I looked at the form I would need to fill out to get the FJ card: name, address, phone, age, income, education, spouse’s name, kids names and ages… I tossed that form in the trash faster than you could believe.

Steve…crusty old phart

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I bought a shaver at the beginning of “The Event” and have cut my own hair for two plus years - takes 5 minutes and saves me $20 a go.

JimA,

I have purchased 4 different types of trimmers, including some “professional quality” clippers. I have an excellent handheld mirror, as well as big plate glass mirrors and a nice mirror on a stand.

After 2 years of cutting my own hair using every sort of trimmer and scissors on the market, my hair still looks like a 4-year-old tried to cut out chunks of bubble gum after an unfortunate spitball fight.

I have only had one decent haircut in over 2 years, when I had a “fully vaccinated” stylist give me a heavy trim during last Summer’s brief COVID respite - before Delta and Omicron showed up.

At the moment, I look like this**:

https://www.berkeleybreathed.com/drinkware/bill-the-cat-thbb…

Thankfully I wear a mask when I’m out in public. No one would ever recognize me in my present state.

Congratulations on having the skill and the patience to give yourself a makover.

**Kudos to Berkeley Breathed and my current fashion icon, Bill the Cat.

:wink:

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After 2 years of cutting my own hair using every sort of trimmer and scissors on the market, my hair still looks like a 4-year-old tried to cut out chunks of bubble gum after an unfortunate spitball fight.

Well, there is your problem; you’ve set your expectations too high.

JimA

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I bought a shaver at the beginning of “The Event” and have cut my own hair for two plus years - takes 5 minutes and saves me $20 a go.

I’ve done better than that for more than a decade: I just stopped getting my hair cut.

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April 2020 I began to cut my hair.

I have gotten excellent at it. Back and front are very good.

I have a complex Irish mane. Two cowlicks. No recessions of the hairline Zero noticeable thinning of the hair, but I started with thicker hair than anyone has a right to.

I fade the burns. I fade a straight edge on the back. I round the back. I hand cut with a scissors the rest of it top and sides. No problem.

I cut my hair about every three weeks. It gets too thick otherwise. It does not really grow down. I grows out wavy.

The advantage over a barber for me is wearing my hair longer than coming out of the barber’s chair when it is shorter than I want it. And not waiting five weeks till it is thicker than I can stand.

I have a mirrored wall in the living room/dining room. I set up a desk chair mat to stand on and catch the falling hair. I can sweep the surface clean afterwards. I have a larger handheld mirror to see the back. A video on Tube said do not move the mirror while cutting the back. Move your hands and head instead.

I have often watched how professional barbers cut my hair. The one big trick is to wet the hair and after cutting the top brush forward the front and sides. Then keeping in mind the length on top cut the bangs equally, and cut the short burns ands temples carefully for length. Trimming around the ears takes a few minutes. I need to wet my hair three times to get this all done. I do towel the hair a bit each time I run the sink water over the hair.

Time 25 minutes. Savings $25 every five weeks. Or about $275 per year.

Enjoyment…priceless…

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I bought a shaver at the beginning of “The Event” and have cut my own hair for two plus years - takes 5 minutes and saves me $20 a go.

Same here, but for many more years.

Me thinks “professional” haircuts are overrated.

Ranks right up there with why your fav employer, Radio Shack, asked for email addresses when a customer buys batteries. Eh?

I remember Radio Shack doing that. I refused. They still sold me the stuff.

Sears had a different idiotic policy, they would not accept my credit card, only their own, but when I tried to pay by check they asked for a ‘major’ credit card. I limited my Sears purchases to certain house brand tools.

The Captain

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At Kroger, you can’t get the advertised price, unless you give up your personal information for their “shopper’s” card.

Unless they have tightened that up recently, you can get a Kroger card without giving the info. I was given the application and told to bring it back when I filled it in. Card was immediately useable. I have often also swiped my card for another customer, and visa versa when I have the set of car keys that doesn’t have my Kroger swipe on it. People are happy to do so to get the gas points. I buy my gas at Costco, so it’s not a motivator for me. Costco on the other hand knows me very well and pays me about $1,000/year for that privilege.

IP

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People are happy to do so to get the gas points. I buy my gas at Costco, so it’s not a motivator for me. Costco on the other hand knows me very well and pays me about $1,000/year for that privilege.

IP

  1. Here, Albertson’s simply asks for home phone number at checkout. I used to decline, then found out that on any given trip, might save up to $5 or $10 on the tab. So I give it. It’s public info, so knock yourself out. Alb’s gets ~~~10% of our annual spending.

  2. Use our Costco-Citibank VISA for EVERYTHING, including Alb’s, all gas**, all charges. (**Get -4% off all gas, not just Costco, which I refuse to wait in line for five or ten cents a gallon.)

  3. The everything VISA habit produces rebates ~~~$600 or $700 each year.

  4. Never, ever carry a balance; totally hooked on OPM (other people’s money) If looking at a particularly large charge, time it to book a day or two after monthly statement closing day. Get to exercise the OPM thingy for a solid five or six weeks overall. Effects a warm fuzzy feeling. I need all the warm and fuzzies I can get these days.

I remember Radio Shack doing that. I refused. They still sold me the stuff.

Some of my customers refused to give up their info too. I still took their money.

That is what is novel about the barber shop’s approach: flatly refusing to take a customer’s money unless they give up their personal info. If they had started this with the start of the plague, when “contact tracing” was a thing, it might be different. But now, two years into the plague? They are clearly doing it entirely to data mine their customers.

Sears had a different idiotic policy,

Sears never refused my “major credit card”, but they did push the heck out of their house card. RS pushed the heck out of their house card too. The narrative that RS management gave was that, if people had an RS only credit card in their pocket, they would be more inclined to shop RS only, rather than other stores.

Steve

Unless they have tightened that up recently, you can get a Kroger card without giving the info.

For the heck of it, I looked on Kroger’s site last night. Found plenty of mentions of their “shopper’s card”, but not a page for applying for the card. Finally did a Google search for “Kroger shopper’s card” and got to the page. Now, they are only asking for name and e-mail. Nope. I get enough spam without Kroger selling my address to everyone.

Steve

Steve…needs to find a new barber shop…

Yet another advantage to being bald. And I can trim my own beard.

JLC

…search for “Kroger shopper’s card” and got to the page. Now, they are only asking for name and e-mail. Nope. I get enough spam without Kroger selling my address to everyone.

So you look online to get a Kroger card and you are surprised they need info? How do you expect them to get it to you?

Walk in to customer service at a store and ask for a card. When they hand you an application, tell them you are in a hurry and will bring it back next time you come in. Do you really think a minimum wager will give you a hard time for that?

I went once to a Harris Teeter and asked for a card. I would have had to give them a copy of my license to do so. Never been back. If I need something that Costco can’t provide, my first stop is Trader Joes. No sales at all, no card at all. Aldi and Kroger everything else.

IP

Unless they have tightened that up recently, you can get a Kroger card without giving the info. I was given the application and told to bring it back when I filled it in.

I just ask the checker if I can borrow one, and they have a store card handy that they scan.

At Kroger, you can’t get the advertised price, unless you give up your personal information for their “shopper’s” card.

Unless they have tightened that up recently, you can get a Kroger card without giving the info. I was given the application and told to bring it back when I filled it in.

Years ago I filled out one of those applications (not a Kroger application, another chain). I was told they wanted the address where I wished to receive flyers and other communications. So I wrote the store’s address.

That is what is novel about the barber shop’s approach: flatly refusing to take a customer’s money unless they give up their personal info. If they had started this with the start of the plague, when “contact tracing” was a thing, it might be different. But now, two years into the plague? They are clearly doing it entirely to data mine their customers.

Have you ever thought about doing the obvious?

Fill out all the information with fake info and pay them in cash.

Mike

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