Semi OT: Excess Winter Mortality

Both heat and cold can result in excess deaths. Gasparrini et al. looked at the causes of death in England and Wales over a 20-year period (2000-2019). They found there were 791 deaths attributable to heat and 60,573 attributable to cold.

The authors write “Our analysis indicates that the excess in mortality attributable to cold was almost two orders of magnitude higher than the excess in mortality attributable to heat.”
www.sciencedirect.com/science/article/pii/S2542519622001383

DB2

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Gasparrini et al. looked at the causes of death in Gasparrini et al. looked at the causes of death in England and Wales over a 20-year period (2000-2019). They found there were 791 deaths attributable to heat and 60,573 attributable to cold. over a 20-year period (2000-2019). They found there were 791 deaths attributable to heat and 60,573 attributable to cold.

Up until very recently, it rarely got very hot in England and Wales.

intercst

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Normal seasonal variation, like the way the price of gas soars near Memorial Day, then falls off after the 4th of July?

Steve

Gasparrini et al. looked at the causes of death in England and Wales over a 20-year period (2000-2019). They found there were 791 deaths attributable to heat and 60,573 attributable to cold. over a 20-year period (2000-2019). They found there were 791 deaths attributable to heat and 60,573 attributable to cold.

Up until very recently, it rarely got very hot in England and Wales.

Interestingly, the mortality curve is U-shaped and is seen all over the world, including the tropics. The low-mortality part of the curve tends to be around what is ‘normal’ for that region.

A study in Latin America covering the 2002-15 period found an 8-fold preponderance of cold over heat deaths.
https://www.nature.com/articles/s41591-022-01872-6

In the city of Pune in India between 2004 and 2012 cold deaths were almost seven times greater than heat-related deaths.
www.sciencedirect.com/science/article/pii/S0013935121016054

DB2

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When I visited England, many homes did not have central heating. The heaters were coin-operated. The poor might run out of money to heat their homes. That might be why there was much higher excess mortality in the winter months. I don’t know if that is still the case or whether the poor are aided with heating costs as they are in some areas of the U.S.

Plus, the U.K. had very few excess heat days compared with excess cold days.

Wendy

Since 1999, at least 1,400 people — 70 per year — have died of heat-related causes in Texas, second only to Arizona.

When it comes to heat, Texas leads the nation in several grim statistics: summertime electricity disconnections, heat-related work deaths, and infant and toddler deaths in hot cars.

https://stories.usatodaynetwork.com/hostagetoheat/texas-poli…

Jaak

When I visited England, many homes did not have central heating. The heaters were coin-operated.

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Their homes have baseboard/radiator hot water heating systems with fuel oil boilers - not the forced air ducted natural gas heating systems in the USA. Homes do not have coin-operated fuel oil boilers. Only rental homes have coin-operated fuel oil boilers.

Jaak