They Left the Gym With a New Friend—And Plans for a $125,000 Bathroom

I did a safety upgrade on my bathroom last month by purchasing two of these suction cup grab handles for $1.34/each on Temu. I’m keeping the balance of that $125,000 invested in the stock market.

Did you catch that $2,000 for the wooden stool by the tub?

intercst

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We are not worthy.

No we are not worthy again.

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I had a pair. Every few weeks the suction would fail on one of the cups.
I developed the habit of grabbing and tugging them, every time I entered the shower, before I put any “emergency” weight/stress grab on them.

FWIW :ring_buoy:
ralph

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Yes, that’s true. I already had one of those grab bars in the tub for the past 10 years. I have to reset the suction cups about once every other month. You just need to make sure the surface of the tiles are clean.

I think I paid about $15 for the one I bought ten years ago, so $1.34 was a bargain. It appears to be the same model from the same manufacturer. But who knows, everything in China may be coming from the same factory.

intercst

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When I upgraded my bathroom by replacing the tub with a shower and had two grab bars on the walls. Rock solid and very nice.

JimA

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Among the doctors I was raised by one stepdaughter became a doctor. She married a much older college professor. He died in the shower. Hit his head I guess when he slipped.

I’d venture it is better not to yank upward when slipping downward and the suction cups fail as usual.

Get a tiler and get the job done.

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I built a handrail for my mom. A length of steel pipe and some fittings

The Captain .

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I took out my bathtub in one of the bathrooms and put in a walk in shower. Once I had all the drywall off the walls I could mark the studs and put grab bars all around the shower along with a seat against the wall. The hardest part is getting the slope in the shower correct. I wouldn’t use the suction type, it just isn’t worth it.

Andy

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We remodeled our bathroom last Summer (2022). Part of the remodel was removing the tub and replacing it with a walk-in shower. There are plenty of grab bars. At the time I didn’t even think about grab bars for the throne. I kinda thought that was funny.

Fast forward to October-November of this year and I developed a problem with my right ankle. Guess what? It ain’t funny no more. Wish I had installed grab bars around the throne.

ImAGolfer

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An excellent reason to future proof the body. On my Centenarian Decathlon list (per Peter Attia) and something I repeatedly reminded my BodyPump class members of WRT squats…getting up from the toilet unaided is a hugely valuable skill.

Useful self test/progressive exercise for anyone…a “sit to stand”, weighted sit to stand, one legged sit to stand. Plus all the balance exercises listed in other threads.

As I also reminded my class members…you can listen to me now, or believe me later

Going to need these skills in just over a months time after my lapiplasty surgery.

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I’m obviously targeting the wrong crowd with my wood working hobby creations.

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I didn’t read the article, but if they can afford it and they enjoy it, so what? Not every last penny has to be saved forever.

Some might consider the cost of a private pilot license in retirement a waste. :wink:

—Peter

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Absolutely! It’s unjustifiable, and piston-powered, small planes are still burning leaded fuel.

intercst

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Good luck with that. BIL had one done and wished he had left it alone. Foot surgery is no joke.

IP

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Well, I’ve already had a taste…I had my right foot done in October of 2021. Even though the recovery period was complication free, it was still a bear. Nothing I couldn’t have predicted but you still don’t know how awful feeling awful and in pain can be…until you actually are. I recall thinking that, if the left foot got no worse than it was back then, I wouldn’t go for getting it fixed. Of course, since “getting worse” is what my bunions have done since they first started barely 15 years ago, there was really no reason to expect anything different from what’s happened.

Whole foot is painful now…a feeling of ligaments stretching to capacity as the bones have shifted so far from “normal”. I had to go shopping in my slippers earlier this week…like a little ole granny👵.

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Sorry to hear it. BIL’s was so bad they had to leave a metal plate in his foot, as well as screws. Mobility has decreased to the point that he’s wondering if he would have better off not getting it done. Probably more extreme a case than most.

Hope it goes well for you.

IP

Like this you mean?

This was the post op radiograph after the first surgery. As bad as it looks, I would’ve ducked out of fixing the left had it stayed like this. You can see what my current discomfort is due to, though, with overly strained ligaments etc.

The orthopedist was quite honest with what to expect…at least as far as my experience indicates…and actually said about 20% or so of patients have the hardware removed. For sure, the right foot feels stiffer than the other…but maybe that’s what feet that don’t develop bunions actually feel like?

One thing that surprised me is the extent to which the “use it or lose it” concept applies to folk as they get older. Now, for about 3 months before my surgery, I definitely pushed the envelope with training for supercompensation…expecting to lose some degree of fitness and so tried to build in some extra spare capacity. Especially strength and particularly fast twitch fiber type stuff, which is the first to go. It wasn’t enough to compensate for just a few weeks or so of being out of normal (my normal) action. Gawd knows how folk fare if they don’t have that sort of cardiovascular conditioning and basic strength/muscle mass…or maybe, if someone is only keen to get back to the couch, it’s not obvious?

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Not sure what this means.

Mine are not stiff, but I am very active also.

BIL definitely not a couch potato. It is crazy, however, the seeming domino effect of one procedure triggering more. His joints are giving away. Shoulder, feet, knees and now hip. Perhaps he should have been less active.

My feet are going to be a problem for me as well, with arthritis in my big toe joints. Happily I ignored the advice of the ortho guy who said to wear a metal plate in my shoes and come back when ready for surgery. Instead I researched how to resolve the toe cramping that caused the arthritis, (he said he knew of nothing,) putting myself on a course of Mg supplementation that resolved the cramps, but only after years of damage. Dad had the same issue and I thought I had just inherited it from him. Glucosamine/condriton/MSM helps considerably as well. At least my kids will know what to do if they are impacted down the road.

On another note, have you ever checked out Dr. Rhonda Patrick? I enjoy her newsletters and she has podcasts as well, though that’s not my thing. Very informative: https://www.foundmyfitness.com/

IP

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VeeEnn needs to chime in but I think she is talking quicker reflexes in the foot by twitch fibers. Better twitch muscles in the legs mean more speed.

VeeEnn, I have done a lot of PT. There are windows as we age where prior to a certain age point things have not sort of solidified. Really pre age 60 for things but I am hardly an expert. My neck and upper back had a bit of a curve at age 58. Not really much but before age 60 I worked on it and it did not solidify with a slight hunched overbearing.

I am working on my feet and hands now. But I work on everything constantly. The feet and hands are the extremities which is a further in point for PT. Do you know how some older folks get a bent top of the finger? I am working the ligaments of my fingers to stop any stress locking in. I am also working my feet so the balls of my feet are more relaxed and stretched for more movement.

I get into pain if I do not. Weightlifting and being heavy have left me stretching and working things out. I am lucky to get to it earlier in life in my 50s.

Google will gift anyone interested with as much anatomical and physiological background on fast and slow twitch fibers as they might want…and more. In a nutshell, fast twitch fibers are the strength, speed, size fibers and slow, the steady Eddie, fatigue resistant endurance fibers. It’s the fast twitch fibers that will help you do the weighted, single leg sit to stand exercise mentioned upstream…and that will help keep you independent and out of the nursing home.

Use them or lose them…and lose them at your peril. When you hear talk of muscle loss with age, it’s mainly loss of fast twitch fibers that’s responsible…and entering the senior years without a decent amount of muscle to begin with means that there’s not much room for loss.

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