Battery storage cost

From 2019:
How Inexpensive Must Energy Storage Be for Utilities to Switch to 100 Percent Renewables?
https://spectrum.ieee.org/what-energy-storage-would-have-to-…
“Low-cost storage is the key to enabling renewable electricity to compete with fossil fuel generated electricity on a cost basis,” says Yet-Ming Chiang, a materials science and engineering professor at MIT.

But exactly how low? Chiang, professor of energy studies Jessika Trancik, and others have determined that energy storage would have to cost roughly US $20 per kilowatt-hour (kWh) for the grid to be 100% powered by a wind-solar mix. Their analysis is published in Joule.

That’s an intimidating stretch for lithium-ion batteries, which dipped to $175/kWh in 2018. But things look up if you loosen the constraints on renewable energy, the researchers say. Then, storage technologies that meet the cost target are within reach.

DB2

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That’s an intimidating stretch for lithium-ion batteries, which dipped to $175/kWh in 2018.

https://about.bnef.com/blog/battery-pack-prices-fall-to-an-a…

According to the above article the price was $1200 in 2010 and is now about $132/kwh.
Almost 10x in 11 years! In order to get to $20, it is only about 6x lower than today. With all the research that has been going on for the last 5-10 years, there should be a few improvements in the pipeline as well as some mass production efficiencies that are directed specifically at grid batteries instead of just phones, laptops, tools and cars. The difference is that grid batteries don’t have as much of a size & weight limitation as all those other use cases.

Mike

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That’s an intimidating stretch for lithium-ion batteries, which dipped to $175/kWh in 2018.

According to the above article the price was $1200 in 2010 and is now about $132/kwh.


Here is an article from 2021 about the Moss Landing battery storage system in California.

https://www.powermag.com/vistra-energizes-massive-1-2-gwh-ba…

McNamara also noted that owing to a steady decline in the cost of power from batteries over the last decade—the cost for a standalone ESS [Energy Storage System] now averages about $209/kWh, he said—the cost of using a state-of-the-art ESS is “extremely competitive compared to running a fossil fuel peaker plant.”


So that is $209/kwh, presumably for installed cost.

It should also be noted that the Moss Landing batteries can only supply electricity for 4 hours at full output. Gas turbine peakers can provide power 24 hours a day if they need to, albeit at a rather high fuel cost. But if people need to run their air conditioners well into the evening, then the power company will do what it needs to in order to keep the grid stable.

  • Pete
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…energy storage would have to cost roughly US $20 per kilowatt-hour (kWh) for the grid to be 100% powered by a wind-solar mix.


That sounds to me like they will need to develop some entirely new technology that uses much cheaper materials. The cost of mining and processing lithium isn’t going to decline by 80%, or whatever is needed to achieve the $20/kwh target.

  • Pete

According to the above article the price was $1200 in 2010 and is now [2021] about $132/kwh.

I read elsewhere that the current cost is back up to $170. As discussed in other threads, the era of steadily declining prices may be over. Other chemistries may have to take over.

DB2

That sounds to me like they will need to develop some entirely new technology that uses much cheaper materials.

Yup, Like Plastic!

OTFoolish

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the cost for a standalone ESS [Energy Storage System] now averages about $209/kWh,

It would be interesting to know what that number includes. For example, land, site prep, power grid switching and connections, installation, a control center (does it even have one?)

Mike

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It should also be noted that the Moss Landing batteries can only supply electricity for 4 hours at full output.

The ability to supply large amounts of stored power is not a downside. You don’t HAVE to use the full power. If you have 1200 MWh stored, only being able to generate 50 MW isn’t an advantage over being able to generate 300 MW.

That sounds to me like they will need to develop some entirely new technology that uses much cheaper materials.

Yup, Like Plastic!

Let’s hope so. I started posting on the climate board back in '06 and would occasionally post about battery breakthroughs. I stopped after a few years because while there were steady price decreases there didn’t seem to be any commercial breakthroughs or game changers.

DB2

Pumped water storage is the most common storage method. Used at Niagara Falls. What is its cost?

Ditto elevator or compressed air mechanical storage?

They say sodium batteries will be cheaper. How much cheaper?

Pumped fluid batteries have much higher storage capacity–especially stationary. Cheaper?