Hard Landing for Alaska Airlines B737

How high do you bounce when the landing gear strut punctures the wing and the left side engine is dragging on the taxiway?

I wonder if this is a survivable event for the captain?

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It doesn’t take much for a 73 engine to drag on the taxiway.

I had a bouncer coming in to ORD, in an AMR DC-10, a few years after an AMR DC-10 augered in at ORD. Left gear hit hard. Plane bounced back into the air, then landed on the right gear. Bounced into the air and started to roll to the left. They had closed circuit TV of the cockpit playing on the movie screen in steerage. I saw the co-pilot was driving. The pilot reached over and tapped the co-pilot’s hand on the yoke, after the second bounce. The co-pilot let go of the yoke and the captain fought to get the plane straightened out, as I saw him using a lot of shoulder english to get enough leverage on the yoke. (Douglas planes had a reputation for handling like pigs, vs the much more responsive Boeings) One of my more “memorable” flying experiences.

The one that augered in? This pic was all over the media for weeks.

Aa191_ohare

Any landing you can walk away from is a good landing. If you can still fly the plane it is a great landing. This was a good landing.

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I don’t know. They have a G-sensor in commercial aircraft to measure the impact of a hard landing. (And also catch a pilot who fails to report one.) If the airframe was subjected to too many G’s, they might write off the aircraft rather than undergo an expensive repair where you have to strip the plane down to the wing strut and check everything for metal fatigue.

intercst

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