Hydrogen energy

Despite “promised decisive breakthroughs” on a power plant strategy in 2023, “none of the necessary issues have been clarified,” Russwurm said on Tuesday (16 January)…

In early August 2023, the German government triumphantly announced that the European Commission had essentially greenlit its plan for subsidised backup power plants.

That meant 8.8 GW of dedicated hydrogen power plants, alongside 15 GW of natural gas-powered ones that ought to switch to hydrogen by 2035 at the latest, in total representing about one-third of the German peak power demand of 2023…

Because these plants would likely only produce power in periods of sustained low wind and low sun – known as “kalte Dunkelflaute” – they are unlikely to make a profit without state support. And critically, the annual €7 billion earmarked for this purpose “evaporated” following a ruling from Germany’s top court…

DB2

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Here’s a mind boggling estimate:

“BloombergNEF estimates that to generate enough green hydrogen to meet a quarter of the world’s energy needs would take more electricity than the world generates now from all sources and an investment of $11 trillion in production and storage.”

DB2

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Interesting. What fraction of the energy from the sun is captured? I suspect miniscule.

There’s plenty of energy out there if we are willing to invest to capture it. Or should i say “when” we are willing.

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There is a concept called EROI, energy return on investment.

“Energy return on investment (EROI) is a ratio that measures the amount of usable energy delivered from an energy source versus the amount of energy used to get that energy resource.”

With an EROI less than one (less than 0.25!) hydrogen is not what one might call a thermodynamic darling.

Energy Return on Investment (EROI) - Definition, Formula.

DB2

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Thus, hydrogen is no more an energy source, just like electrons aren’t…it is a way to store energy for future use…just like a pumped storage facility or a battery.

Mike

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Does not matter with renewables.

Horrifying results as always with fossil fuels.

Renewables are deflationary. Fossil fuels are inflationary.

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