Japan eyes ammonia for power plants

Japan is currently a massive coal burning nation looking for alternatives such as ammonia.

Japan is furnishing $500 million to much-watched projects that will develop and demonstrate 100% fuel ammonia combustion technology for gas turbines and 50% co-firing at coal boilers, as part of an effort to build out the nation’s supply chain for fuel ammonia.

The country’s national research agency New Energy and Industrial Technology Development Organization (NEDO) on Jan. 7 announced the funding under the Green Innovation Fund. One aspect of the 10-year “Fuel Ammonia Supply Chain Construction Project” will seek to tamp down ammonia production costs to the range hydrogen in terms of calorific value) by 2030. The grant will also develop burner technology to enable high co-firing and dedicated combustion for power generation. They aim to solve the technical issues for expanding and popularizing the use of fuel ammonia and build a fuel ammonia supply chain.

The initiative is rooted in Japan’s October 2020-announced ambitions to become carbon neutral in 2050. While the country heavily depends on coal and liquefied natural gas fuel for power generation, it intends to boost electrification; ramp up its use of hydrogen, methanation, synthesis fuel, and biomass; and decarbonize its coal and gas fleets. Current targets require that 10% of Japan’s electricity by 2050 and at least 1% (around 1 GW) by 2030 will come from hydrogen or ammonia.

https://www.powermag.com/japan-bolsters-fuel-ammonia-combust…

There is global interest in ammonia’s future role in the power sector for decarbonization. Countries with limited direct access to sources of low-carbon power could use ammonia as a vector for hydrogen imports, because ammonia has a high hydrogen content per unit volume, and it can be easily liquefied. Ammonia can also be cracked to yield pure hydrogen for use in gas turbines, but it can also be combusted, directly fed into or co-fired at existing coal plants or gas turbines. Finally, like hydrogen, it can also be used as a seasonal storage medium for the power sector, offering a potentially cheaper alternative to batteries.

Jaak

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The initiative is rooted in Japan’s October 2020-announced ambitions to become carbon neutral in 2050.

Hey, this is serious stuff.

The strange truth about Japan’s climate change target
https://www.spectator.co.uk/article/is-japan-s-climate-chang…
Japan has just raised its target for reducing carbon emissions from 26% to 46% (by 2030 from 2013 levels). But how was this figure arrived at, environment minister Shinjiro Koizumi was asked? Through a careful analysis of the threat and a realistic assessment of what could be achieved, taking all relevant factors into consideration? Well, er no, according to Koizumi, the number 46 just appeared to him in ‘silhouette’ in a sort of vision.

Shinjiro Koizumi, son of former prime minister Junichiro Koizumi, made the comments in an interview with the TV station TBS last weekend. The interviewer, despite her face mask, was clearly stunned by the revelation that the country’s emission target did not appear to have any scientific basis. She asked the minister to confirm what he had said; and he did…

Prime minister Suga has not commented on his environment minister’s green-tinged epiphany, but he confirmed the 46% pledge at the 40-leader climate summit presided over by US president Joe Biden via Zoom last week.

DB2

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When I worked in the oil refinery, the most dangerous liquid on site: ammonia.

Deadly stuff.

Japan has just raised its target for reducing carbon emissions from 26% to 46% (by 2030 from 2013 levels)…according to Koizumi, the number 46 just appeared to him in ‘silhouette’ in a sort of vision.

And then there’s the cost.

Japan’s ambitious carbon target sparks bureaucratic panic
www.ft.com/content/90eefa81-94fd-49b7-9687-a3155b8b3ea7
Taishi Sugiyama, research director at the Canon Institute for Global Studies, said the target was only achievable if Japan accepted a big hit to its economy. A 1 per cent reduction in emissions costs about ¥1tn ($9.1bn) a year, he said, so the 20 percentage point reduction would cost ¥20tn.

That would be equivalent to about 3.5% of gross domestic product, implying that the carbon target would soak up much of the improvement in living standards expected for Japan’s low-growth economy by 2030.

DB2

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