Maintenance on Vacuum Cleaner

I have a Miele upright vacuum. I was vacuuming the carpets before Christmas before my in-laws arrived. While vacuuming, the roller stopped rotating. I turned it over to inspect the roller. With long haired women in the house, it can be wrapped up with hair. I ruined one vacuum by not cleaning out the hair. The roller was relatively clean. Since I didn’t have time for further inspection, I just pulled out an old vacuum to finish the job.

Fast forward to last weekend. I assumed a belt broke powering the roller. When I removed the housing, I discovered the roller is not powered by a belt. It is gear driven with a small electrical motor. I turned on the vacuum to see if the roller would spin. It did. I made the assumption that the roller motor overheated and shut off. I put the vacuum back together. There was some fine dirt that had fallen on the floor during the disassembly and reassembly. I went to vacuum it up. It just made a dust cloud. I put my hand on the end of the hose to the hand tool. There was very little air flow.

From this, I concluded that the hose was clogged. I removed an access panel on the back of the vacuum which allows a person to access the hose where it enters the vacuum. Using my fingers, I was able to remove globs of hair and lint from the entrance to the hose. Also I was able to pull more hair and lint from the hose that goes to the area where the roller is located. Putting the access panel back on, I tried the vacuum again. Another dust cloud when I went to vacuum.

Time to repeat the process. I removed the panel again to open the area where the hoses lead to the bag. Turning on the vacuum, air was pulled through the panel opening. Using my hand, I placed it over the opening several times to seal the opening and create air flow through the hoses. More dirt and air came out. Putting the access panel back on, I tried the vacuum again. Now I was getting air flow through the bottom of the vacuum around the roller but not through the hose to the hand accessories.

Time to repeat the process. This time I removed the hose from where it connects to the vacuum. I stuck a wire into the opening. More dirt and hair came out. I stuck my finger in and felt a hard object. I pulled out a chunk of lumber. Then a lot more dirt balls came out. I guess I may have vacuum the chunk of wood sometime in the past. Probably when vacuuming the SUV. Putting everything back together, the vacuum worked perfectly.

I guess I should put cleaning out the internal cavities of the vacuum on the annual maintenance list.

PSU

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I guess I should put cleaning out the internal cavities of the vacuum on the annual maintenance list.

Yes, once a year. More if you have pets and big family.

Sounds like we have the same vacuum and I know of the plug on the back you speak of. Things tend to get caught up in that area and where the hose bends into the bottom. :slight_smile:

I guess I should put cleaning out the internal cavities of the vacuum on the annual maintenance list.

That’s not a bad idea, but if the chunk of lumber had not gotten stuck most of the other issues probably would not have happened. The low-flow because of the obstruction helped all those others accumulate. While an annual check isn’t a bad idea, I think it is more important to check the total suction every time you use it just by putting your hand over the end. Get to know what it should fee like, and look further when it isn’t right.

Probably when vacuuming the SUV.

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Prolly a task best suited for a wet/dry vacuum–particularly for a person with “equestrian” interests.

Here’s a suggestion for your next system failure:

https://evacuumstore.com/s-2828-miele.aspx?gclid=EAIaIQobChM…

sunray
a man also with multiple vacuums, but disinclined to remove&replace ANYTHING more than a belt

Useful YouTube on the machine:

~~2 minutes

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=G25gdmF2dho

Nice video. I did pretty much what was shown in the video except I tried the panel first instead of removing the hose. It just took several cycles of cleaning to get everything out. It was really packed with dirt.

PSU

guess I should put cleaning out the internal cavities of the vacuum on the annual maintenance list.

Do you actually have “a list”?

The only things I do “annually” are things that have to be done, like turn on/off the whole house humidifier and replace the furnace filters (quarterly.) Otherwise it’s generally “wait til failure”, “curse”, “fix”, and finally “ignore forever until failure again.”

We do clean the Roomba’s quite regularly, but that’s because the just stop in the middle of the room and announce “Error 14” or whatever every couple of hours until they’re attended to.

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Do you actually have “a list”?

Yes, there are certain things that I do annually. Like you, I replace the furnace filters but on an annual, not quarterly basis. The maintenance on my pool requires certain things to be done at certain times of the year. But you are correct that vacuum maintenance is likely a more of a fix it when something is wrong than a scheduled maintenance task.

PSU

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I’ve made a habit of cleaning the Roomba as soon as it’s done with it’s run so that it will be ready for the next time. I only run it about once a week.

PSU
Like you, I replace the furnace filters but on an annual, not quarterly basis. The maintenance on my pool requires certain things to be done at certain times of the year

  1. Here, the furnace filter is more of a ‘run time hours’, as opposed to calendar, thing for me. With an added input of whether air was more or less dust laden. I’d LIKE to come up with a flapper switch framus that can detect reduced air flow at the down wind side of the filter, turning on a light when air flow slows and it’s time to change.

  2. Pool: Contracted out. (Pool shares the definition used with a boat: “A hole in the water into which one pours money.”) Ah, the kids like it, WHEN THE WEATHER IS WARM. Good excuse to visit grandpa and grandma.

  3. Refrigerator condenser coils: Scheduled as calendar items. Time, dusty conditions, and where they are located dictate what the interval needs to be. Useful to keep track of inside the box temps. (Cleaning intervals of 12 months seem to be adequate here.) [Freezers, used to have external condensers, now imbedded in sides of box. i.e. Don’t need cleaning.]

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1. Here, the furnace filter is more of a ‘run time hours’, as opposed to calendar, thing for me. With an added input of whether air was more or less dust laden. I’d LIKE to come up with a flapper switch framus that can detect reduced air flow at the down wind side of the filter, turning on a light when air flow slows and it’s time to change.

I replace it once a year because the first floor unit requires me to crawl across my crawlspace, sometimes on my belly and rolling under pipes. I’m not going to do all that just to inspect the filter. I bring one along and change it no matter what the condition of the current filter.

PSU

I just paid my furnace guys son to clean out my dryer duct, about a 25’ horizontal run I installed in about 1977 when i relocated the laundry to a raised area, leven with the home, so a slight downhill slope. Had never been seriously cleaned, only the visible at the dryer door/filter… I was surprised at how much he was able to get out of there, using the dryer’s blower, while he snaked in a widget to clean the walls… Originally I had flex duct, but it caused back pressure that tripped heat sensors in the old dryer, so smoot aluminum piping solved that, so many years ago!

So once in 50+ years, $100 was well spent…

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