Modified concrete reduces need for cement

Savita Dixit, Professor, Department of Chemistry, Maulana Azad National Institute of Technology, and Gajendra Dixit, Professor Mechanical Engineering Department, were granted a patent by the Government of India for the new discovery of “modified concrete structure”.

This is the sixth patent of Dixit, before that she had been granted five other patents for her discoveries. In this new discovery, she prepared a concrete structure with the help of silica, fibers, GGBs, fumes, etc. which can be seen as an alternative to the presently used cement concrete.

Both Savita Dixit and Gajendra Dixit have been working jointly for the past 20 years through their discoveries to re-use, unusable waste items so that our environment can be made sustainable. Therefore, for this research work, she choose silica, fiber, GGBs, fumes, etc. because this type of waste is the most emitted by humans in the modern world, which is causing a lot of damage to our environment and natural resources.

This will reduce our dependence on cement by about 30 percent. The test also shows that the quality and strength of these concrete bricks made of silica, fiber, GGBs, fumes, etc. is higher than the concrete bricks made of cement and their cost of manufacturing is also less.

https://www.dailypioneer.com/2022/state-editions/manit-profe…

Jaak

24 Likes

GGBS

Ground-granulated blast-furnace slag (GGBS or GGBFS) is obtained by quenching molten iron slag (a by-product of iron and steel-making) from a blast furnace in water or steam, to produce a glassy, granular product that is then dried and ground into a fine powder. Ground-granulated blast furnace slag is highly cementitious and high in calcium silicate hydrates (CSH) which is a strength enhancing compound which improves the strength, durability and appearance of the concrete.

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Ground_granulated_blast-furnac…

The Captain
learned something new today. Thanks.

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If only we could rediscover how the Roman made their cement.
https://science.howstuffworks.com/why-ancient-roman-concrete…

Why are millennia-old ancient Roman piers still standing strong as veritable concrete islands, while modern concrete structures built only decades ago crumble from an onslaught of wind and waves?

Researchers at the University of Utah discovered that as seawater filters through piers and breakwaters made of age-old Roman concrete, the structures actually become increasingly stronger because of the growth of interlocking minerals — including some minerals that are rare or expensive to cultivate in lab settings.

So why aren’t we using Roman-style concrete? For one, we don’t know the recipe. We may think we’re at the height of human knowledge, but the ancients did possess precious knowledge that has been lost to time.

There’s also a load-bearing issue. “Ancient” is the key word in these Roman structures, which took a long, long time to develop their strength from seawater. Young cement built using a Roman recipe would probably not have the compressive strength to handle modern use — at least not initially.

Modern concrete takes 21 days to reach full strength. It gains half strength in 3-4 days. At least that is what I remember as my days of a concrete tester.

Why are millennia-old ancient Roman piers still standing strong as veritable concrete islands, while modern concrete structures built only decades ago crumble from an onslaught of wind and waves?

Maybe Roman concrete didn’t have steel rebars that rust and swell…

How come buildings from the Roman Empire needed no steel reinforcement, when modern buildings do?

The correct answer is, I believe, that Romans never used concrete in tension, only in compression.

https://www.quora.com/How-come-buildings-from-the-Roman-Empi…

The Captain

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They do tell us that ancient Roman structures were damaged by scavengers for their iron content. The church declared many of them holy shrines in an effort to preserve them.

They do tell us that ancient Roman structures were damaged by scavengers for their iron content. The church declared many of them holy shrines in an effort to preserve them.

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What parts of the structures used iron? Any links to your statement?

Jaak

2 Likes

Thats from a tour of Rome years ago. No links. They do have crosses on some of the structures.