OT: try to find the charting URL

I used to see, and used a web site on this board where it lists the chart for 5-year, 10-yr, 20-yr … for most stocks, with the CAGR calculation for the corresponding time frame.
Spent 2 hours looking for it and still could not find it
Will appreciate if you can point me to it

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Was it the BMW charting?
https://invest.kleinnet.com/bmw1/stats16/index.html

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I use portfolio visualizer. https://www.portfoliovisualizer.com/backtest-portfolio

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YES - it’s the BMW chart - thanks so much

YES - it’s the BMW chart - thanks so much

As an aside
Not that it matters to anyone what I think, but I strongly advise never using “BMW method” charts.
The bands/lines on the chart are used to influence investment evaluation, and they’re dangerously meaningless for a variety of reasons, most significantly that they are crystal ball data.
It’s a cute, but very very bad, “line” of reasoning.

I have no reason to suspect that the price data on the chart are wrong.
If that’s what you’re using them for, enjoy.

I use stockcharts a lot.
You are limited to five years as a non-subscriber, but I like that you get total return by default, but can also turn that off.
Secret tip: If you want more than five years of data, it’s extremely easy, though of questionable morality, to bypass that limit without subscribing.
Send me a message if you are interested, and of low morals like me.

Jim

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[emailed, not posted]

Hi Mungo…

What is the method for extending stockcharts beyond 5 years?

Thanks,

Glenn

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oops, didn’t hit the email check box.

email sent.

What is the method for extending stockcharts beyond 5 years?

Somebody emailed me pointing out that my hack is no longer needed.
Apparently the five year limit has been removed…(assuming my memory is correct that it ever existed)
In the date range box, just change the start date to a custom date of your choosing and it works.

Jim

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oops, didn’t hit the email check box.
email sent.

Speaking of email responses, somebody sent me a message and I didn’t reply.
Or rather, I tried…your email address can not be reached from mine for some reason.

Jim

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Somebody emailed me pointing out that my hack is no longer needed.

I apologize for taking this thread OT, but speaking of hacks, does anyone know if Check Capital’s stock charts are available anywhere? I think I first found the link to their charts on this board.
They used to be here:
https://checkcapital.com/newsletter/stock-charts/
or here:
https://checkcapital.com/pdf/Current_Holdings_Website.pdf

They hold a lot of stocks that are discussed on occasion here or on the BRK board. Stocks such as BRK, BAM, GOOG, LKQ, KMX, MKL, etc.

I strongly advise never using “BMW method” charts.
The bands/lines on the chart are used to influence investment evaluation, and they’re dangerously meaningless for a variety of reasons, most significantly that they are crystal ball data…

Hi Jim!

I totally agree…if one is using the BMW charts for “investment evaluation”.

However, I use the BMWM charts as one more screen to identify companies that MAY be overvalued or undervalued…and then do my own due diligence to find out the “why” of such stock price performance (i.e. investment evaluation).

Used that way, they have been useful to me over the years.

Cheers!
Murph
BL Home Fool
(you uses the BMWM as a screen for large/midcap companies with a minimum of 30 years of data)

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However, I use the BMWM charts as one more screen to identify companies that MAY be overvalued or
undervalued…and then do my own due diligence to find out the “why” of such stock price performance
(i.e. investment evaluation).

Yes, a lot of people say that. I’m not buyin’ what they’re sellin’.
The lines on the graph are (a) dangerously misleading and (b) also just plain wrong.
If they are on the chart, it is human nature to ascribe meaning to them, so they can only make one’s investment decisions worse, never better.

It isn’t hard to find a long term price chart that does not have this problem, so there is no reason to use the BMW charts just for the price history.
And many such other chart sources are adjusted for dividends, and a few are also even adjusted for inflation, so they’re better basic price information.

But for preliminary searching? Also no.
If one wants a way to generate candidates for what’s on sale, there are lots of FAR better metrics that will actually give a meaningful result.
In general, there’s a metric particularly suited to each class of company.
Even simple P/E works better than price regression.

As for possible sources, check out the charts from securities-research.com
In the “free” category, add the “Rolling EPS” and “Rolling P/E” fields to a bigcharts.com chart.

So, my advice stands…never look at the BMW charts.
They can only make you worse.

Used that way, they have been useful to me over the years.
Though that’s great, the word “despite” springs unbidden to my mind : )

Jim

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