Removing germs, viruses, bacteria and more

This is 4-yrs old, but the production tech is just getting started. Nothing cheap YET, but once the production volume is high, costs will plummet.

https://www.laserfocusworld.com/lasers-sources/article/16571…

“Integrated into overhead lights, excimer lamps would kill airborne viruses and bacteria with no danger to human skin and eyes.”

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Kill enough germs, viruses, and bacteria and we won’t need immune systems but when some germ, virus, or bacteria slips by we’ll all be dead.

The Captain

Killing everything is not a good idea!

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Kill enough germs, viruses, and bacteria and we won’t need immune systems but when some germ, virus, or bacteria slips by we’ll all be dead.

The Captain

Killing everything is not a good idea!

Yes, without bacteria there is nothing left to clean up the mess?

Anymouse

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Yes, without bacteria there is nothing left to clean up the mess?

Don’t underestimate the supernova cleansing end…

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=C3ue7cEocvI

The Captain

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Kill enough germs, viruses, and bacteria and we won’t need immune systems but when some germ, virus, or bacteria slips by we’ll all be dead.

The Captain

Killing everything is not a good idea!

I like the idea of the antimicrobial excimer lamps, and I’m not worried that they’d kill everything. I’m sure that germs could hide in darker places that aren’t exposed. At least the viral/bacterial loads will be limited to a much more manageable level. Also, there’s a chance of being exposed to viruses and bacteria outdoors, but the viral/bacterial loads there will also be limited to a much more manageable level.

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Killing everything is not a good idea!

Many years ago read a study about why the increase in childhood asthma. Long story short: homes, schools, etc. were too clean. Kids that played in the dirt or had a dog, had lower rates.

JLC

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JLC: Many years ago read a study about why the increase in childhood asthma. Long story short: homes, schools, etc. were too clean. Kids that played in the dirt or had a dog, had lower rates.

The ‘hygiene hypothesis’ is an urban legend.

That’s why researchers and medical professionals in Lynch’s field of infectious disease and immunology cringe at the name “hygiene hypothesis,” he says. It implies that good personal hygiene is related to higher rates of disease when, in fact, it’s the opposite.

The hygiene hypothesis is a “dangerous misnomer which is misleading people away from finding the true causes of these rises in allergic disease.”

https://rightasrain.uwmedicine.org/well/health/hygiene-hypot….

https://www.pnas.org/doi/10.1073/pnas.1700688114

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Killing everything is not a good idea!

Without getting too far into specifics, last March I spent a few days in the hospital because of a bacterial infection. The doctors gave me large amounts of antibiotics, first through an IV, then in pill form. The antibiotics did a good job of wiping out the infection, but a side effect was the drugs also killed off the so-called “good bacteria” in my digestive system.

I had to keep taking the antibiotic pills for a few weeks after I left the hospital, so it was about a month of some pretty severe diarrhea. Fighting off the infection was bad enough, but having my digestive system all messed up was just as unpleasant.

That said, I am all in favor of the UV lights described in the OP. It might be best to install those lights in the air conditioning systems of large public buildings. The air is continually sterilized of airborne pathogens as it circulates throughout the building.

I am also a long-time advocate of using somewhat harder radiation to sterilize food, to protect against things like E.Coli and salmonella.

https://www.epa.gov/radtown/food-irradiation

  • Pete
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¡Ni tan calvo ni con dos pelucas!

Neither so bald nor with two wigs!

Cleanliness is one thing, killing everything is an exaggeration.

We need to train our immune systems, that’s what vaccines do. Why else would you want to inject yourself with deadly bugs?

The Captain

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I had to keep taking the antibiotic pills for a few weeks after I left the hospital, so it was about a month of some pretty severe diarrhea. Fighting off the infection was bad enough, but having my digestive system all messed up was just as unpleasant.

Did anyone mention yogurt with active cultures? Helps restore things faster.

JLC

Did anyone mention yogurt with active cultures? Helps restore things faster.
JLC

My doctor prescribed Culturelle, an over-the-counter probiotic.

https://www.amazon.com/Culturelle-Probiotic-Digestive-Natura…

I believe one of the nurses also mentioned yogurt as a natural source of probiotics. The most effective thing, though, was simply finishing the antibiotic pills (amoxicillin).

  • Pete
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