Sustainable indigenous sea gardens

The “tragedy of the commons,” where a resource that belongs to everyone is destroyed by over-exploitation, has Macro implications in a world where major fisheries have been wiped out even while the population is growing.

This interesting article describes “sea gardens” which were established by indigenous people around the world for very large but sustainable harvests over thousands of years. These techniques were developed during sea level rise after the last Ice Age.

Archaeological evidence, paired with Indigenous oral histories, Salomon says, shows how by focusing on common reciprocal, relationship-based principles and governance practices — ones that sustain individuals, communities, and their environments — Indigenous communities often made decisions that led to huge harvests while also putting some limits on the scale at which that intensification was happening.

The key is “limits.”

People have to be willing to limit their exploitation of the resource to a sustainable amount. Seems like a no-brainer, but Western history is full of examples where valuable resources were used until they collapsed.

https://www.smithsonianmag.com/science-nature/how-indigenous…

Wendy

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Indigenous communities often made decisions that led to huge harvests while also putting some limits on the scale at which that intensification was happening.

Would not work today because it interferes with the “free market” and maximizing profit (which mostly goes to top management).

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