Totally OT: APOE-e4 allele, exercise and statin

The APOE gene is involved in making a protein that helps carry cholesterol and other types of fat in the bloodstream. Problems in this process are thought to contribute to the development of Alzheimer’s. APOE comes in several forms, called alleles (e.g., ε2, ε3 and ε4). The ε4 allele is ancestral since it is the one found in closely related species such as chimpanzees. The other alleles are relatively recent mutations (tens of thousands of years).

About 20% of Americans, and about 60% of all Alzheimer’s patients, carry at least one copy of E4. People with an E4/E4 genotype (a double dose of the high-risk ApoE4 allele) are roughly 10 times as likely to develop Alzheimer’s as E3/E3 carriers are.

Previous study has shown that an hour of daily exercise drops the risk of the E4/E4 genotype.

Newly published research shows that taking a statin significantly reduces the risk of dementia in the E4/E4 genotype. (Hazard Ratio: 60%).

It’s worth finding out whether you carry this genotype since you can take action to significantly reduce your risk.

Wendy

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The USian preference, as in the case with repurposed drugs to “lose weight”, is usually take a pill, instead of doing the actual work.

The TV I used to watch, while I pedaled the exercise bike pooped out last week. Replaced with a 32" rescued from the Salvation Army for $12.

Steve

Whilst this may very well be true, it’s a good idea to remember…or be aware if you didn’t know in the first place…that genetic predisposition is just that, and is oftentimes strong enough to override even the best custodianship of ones body.

This shouldn’t lead anyone to infer that I’m suggesting it’s an either or situation…healthy lifestyle choices over the long haul are obviously a good idea…but given the prevalence of the opposite, it becomes all too easy to fall for the error of thinking that healthy choices/real food etc are adequate for make the need to exogenous molecules (drugs or supplements) redundant.

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Yes, this is true. Then there are people like one of the project managers where I used to work. Tom was wolfing down a steak, and one of the other guys at the table said “don’t you have a problem with cholesterol?” Tom said “I take pills for that”.

The sales pitch for a lot of the quack pills I see on TV is taking their pill is better than doing the right thing. I remember one quack ad that was pitching their pill in place of eating grapefruit. In the ad, they showed a guy wearing a flannel shirt and a hard hat, with a grapefruit in his hand. The guy says “I ain’t eating these things”, then he crushed the grapefruit.

Love for panaceas is a “traditional American value”.

Steve