AT&T Spammer calls

After many decades of landline service, it’s getting real close to the time to shut it off…

Spammer calls vary from 2-to as many as 6 o7 daily, to where I off-hook, onhook without even saying anything any more… I was having a little fun hitting 0 or 1 to get to a live person, that guy with the odd accent, a variety of names, sometimes ladies, asking why they were lying, no, I am not your Dish or Sperum customer… No I don’t want to save on car repairs, etc…

The main reason initially for keeping the landline was for the E911 service, and that even in power failures, there would still be service. But now, very doubtful as the local cabinet where fiber terminates has a limited batter life…

Very close to dropping off, recycling all the subsets…

weco

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I turned the ringers off on my landline phones years ago. People who actually have business with me leave a message. Some of the scammers leave a message too. The “delete” button on the answering machine works perfectly.

Steve

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Yes, I also have most of the ringers off, left one at a really low volume, but it’s till an irritant… Lately I shut off the answering machine, one less irritant…

Someone mentioned they have a blocking ability, without CallerID, on their phone, but I didn’t get the brand, and if that exists, I’ll jump on one… at&t itself could do it, but don’t…

Lately I shut off the answering machine, one less irritant…

I used to have an answering machine that used tapes. I would start to growl when I heard the outgoing message tape start. Now, I have a solid state machine, so, unless the scammer stays on the line long enough to start the inbound recording, I don’t hear a thing.

Steve

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So far the blockers I see require CallerID subscriptions… Free on cellular, held hostage by at&t… Already pay too much to begin with, not adding on…

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Great topic.

I am not on AT&T for my landline, but I too get all these annoying calls that seem to spoof numbers in my area (sometimes they almost come close to numbers of old friends, which is kind of creepy). When there is a legitimate call, I am always amazed.

I wish I could figure out how to shut the ringer on my landline. I had an old Radio Shack phone system (cordless) for the longest time, then had to get a new, comparable one (I want to say it is the brand that begins with V, forget the full name off hand). For some reason, it always rings twice, then goes to voice mail…I can never answer it. So I always have to check messages, even for legitimate calls. I only have a flip cell for emergencies…I’m really not a phone person. Don’t use it for any smart features (if it even has them) and it is behind in the Gs (stuck at 4; I was sent a new one to replace the 3).

I hate paying my landline bill, but I am going to keep it. I too worry about emergency calling; I want to make sure my address comes up to the service, and although I am sure the digital/cable lines do the same thing, I just don’t have the confidence in it; probably just my ignorance. I should say too just for nostalgic reasons, I’d like to keep it. I am fighting becoming part of the cell phone generation.

I have to say, I did not understand the following:

“But now, very doubtful as the local cabinet where fiber terminates has a limited batter life…”

What does that exactly mean? Do you mean you have a landline that is connected to the web?

I have to say, I did not understand the following:

“But now, very doubtful as the local cabinet where fiber terminates has a limited batter life…”

What does that exactly mean? Do you mean you have a landline that is connected to the web?

In order for the then Pacific Bell to provide internet access out to about 3 mills from the Central Office (CO), they made fiber optic links to local, to me, terminal cabinets that break the optical signals back down so it’s back on local copper lines. About 2 or 3 blocks away… Those terminal cabinets have to be powered, normally by commercial AC, but with battery backup, but this batteries are fairly limited as far as holding a charge. The CO has very large batteries, backup Generators or Tubings to keep them going, but all the remote terminal cabinets will need temporary generators to keep going more than a day, depending on usage…

The program that added the fiber links was called project Pronto… Initially it was going to replace all the copper with optical fiber to every home, but it ended when local beauocracies, heavy trenching cost made it an impossible task… At the time. in the '90s, my employer, Lucent Tech was the primary contractor for the project, we had acres and acres of equipment, fiber optic cable, NG generators, terminal cabinets, but it was cancelled, scrapped, managers retired, so only portions were done by local PacBell construction folks…

By the time I retired in '02 there wasn’t a sign of any further interest…

weco

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Thanks for that explanation. I now understand and learned something. I’m assuming my landline would not be affected by battery usage as it is the old type from years ago. (I hope, anyway)

So far the blockers I see require CallerID subscriptions… Free on cellular, held hostage by at&t…

iirc, CallerID is part of the package with my U-Verse comms service, but my phones are so old they don’t support CallerID.

For some reason, it always rings twice, then goes to voice mail.

I am assuming your cordless has the answering machine built into the base unit. It’s probably something in the setup of the system, like setting the number of rings before the machine kicks in.

Your phone may be a VTech. My aunt had a VTech cordless. I took it out when I installed a Clarity (line of phones designed for people with impaired hearing) cordless set for her. Some time later, she had gotten the answering machine on the Clarity messed up. I was in the attic with her going through her late husband’s (retired career Western Electric guy) stuff, and I heard someone leaving a message on the answering machine. Back in the house, I checked the Clarity answering machine. Nothing on it. Some time later, I noticed the display on the base of the AT&T cordless in the kitchen showing messages waiting. Found several messages on the AT&T. Apparently, the AT&T’s answering machine had been set “on” all along, but was set to answer after a high number of rings, so never tripped before the answering machine on, first, the VTech, then the Clarity, which were set for a lower number of rings, picked up, until my aunt messed up the settings on the Clarity.

Steve

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Old copper lines that were near the Central offices wouldn’t be affected by the fiber links, likely under 2 miles, there was a footage limit, but it would also depend on what your local provider has done to extend their network/services… PacBell was pushing for DSL & TV over their copper lines, but it became too expensive… Last & heard from a field tech was that they wanted to abandon copper and go to local wireless… Voip…

(retired career Western Electric guy) stuff

So your Uncle was a WeCo guy! Hopefully a long and enjoyable career, we (WE) had so many factories, plants, Service Centers, field engineering, Installation groups it’s still mind boggling that it’s gone… I had near 40 years, ending in '02 with Lucent Tech, but worked with so many great people over the years, but, sadly, many have left us… There is a Western Electric/Bell Group as well as other Bell System of US & Canada, Alcatel and other telecom Groups that helps link folks together, share stories, Obits… Again, hard to imagine it all came undone…

So your Uncle was a WeCo guy!

I have mentioned him before. The guy who kept hand written paperwork for things checked out of the Kalamazoo Michigan Bell toolroom in 48, but didn’t keep any cost basis info for his T stock.

He moved to Cleveland when his wife, my aunt, got a job within her college degree there. He worked at Electro-Motive for a bit, wiring control panels, then moved to WeCo, wiring up switches. He finished as an instructor at the Dublin Ohio training center. They offered him a buyout around 85, when he was about 56.

Steve

Well, I can’t blame him as far as calculating cost basis on our T, LU shares, in my case, as hourly, each week was variable amount, but the purchase was done monthly, so in the end as we sold off the last of the LU, which had become NOK, it was just a WAG, wild … guess, pick a number, who’s going to spend the time to prove it wrong. Nobody…

WeCo folks did move about, ending at the Training Center in Dublin was good, spent many weeks there off n on, many excellent instructors and a chance to meet fellow telecom/WeCo Installers from around the country…

So many good jobs in so many fields, poof, gone… I held out until I was nearing 62, when they made me an offer, adding to the pension, and seeing how it was going, I saw way more road time, maybe forced moves, so I grabbed it, DW was still working, so while it was a little shut for a while, we made it through… Spent that early retirement time trying to sort out all the bits and pieces of sock splits, mergers, and gathering them all into an EJ account, and simplifying the mess…

Survival!

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