Cause of Death: End Stage Poverty

I know that conservatives will counsel, that if this gentleman only had “longer bootstraps” he would have survived, but this is just nuts.

{{ Now with a clear voice, he tells her that if his arm must be amputated, he doesn’t want to live. She doesn’t understand what it’s like to survive on the streets, he continues. With a disability, he’ll be a target — robbed, assaulted. He’d rather die, unless, he says later, someone can find him a permanent apartment. In that case, he’ll proceed with the amputation.

The psychiatrists evaluate him. He’s not suicidal. His reasoning is logical. The social workers search for rooms, but in San Francisco far more people need long-term rehousing than the available units can accommodate. That the medical care the patient is receiving exceeds the cost of a year’s rent makes no practical difference. Eventually, the palliative care doctors see him. He transitions to hospice and dies. }}

It’s like we’re willing to pay extra, to be as cruel humanly possible.

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Sometimes, I worry about the future of humanity. But then I read the last paragraph of this editorial, and realize that there is hope out there.

When we debrief, residents tell me how much they struggle with the moral dissonance of working in a system in which the best medicine they can provide often falls short. They’re right about how much it hurts, so I don’t know exactly what to say to them. Perhaps I never will.

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The puritanical, punishment culture prevails in Shiny-land. It is culturally unacceptable for poor people to enjoy any comfort at all, otherwise, there would be no incentive for anyone to work. Right?

Steve

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Righteous indignation is pointless. The question is how to solve the problem.

Simple fact is that many more people want to live in SF than it can house. Should you force the current residents of SF to accept high rise, high density housing that will very likely change the look and culture of the city? Or should you forcibly move the homeless out to places where housing is more affordable?

Many of the homeless are that way because of addictions or mental illness. Should we have them institutionalized where they can be treated even if against their will? If you don’t do that, how will they ever get off the streets?

SF is probably the most progressive city in America. What are they doing wrong?

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SF zoning doesn’t allow the coffin apts of Hong Kong. As bad as these are, it’s preferable to living in a tent on the street.

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The residents are retirees, working poor, drug addicts and people with mental illnesses, mostly those unable to keep pace with the spiralling cost of housing in Hong Kong.

Why are they lumping retirees in with all those other demographics as if they were alike?

And what’s the backstory of all these other people? It’s usually less sympathetic than it’s presented. i.e. They had more than a little to do with it.
btresist is right righteous indignation won’t fix it and btw, why can’t other people have a say in the solution? Righteous Indignation is The Left’s version of The Right’s ridiculous bleatings of “thoughts and prayers.”

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Retirees are simialr in that they are losing their housing. The recent inflation has caused many fixed income seniors to lose their abodes.

But here is the hard question. The examples in your link are retirees who want to live in D.C. I suspect a large proportion of retirees with similar financial problems are also in locations where housing prices are very high. Does the government have an obligation to subsidize housing for these folks in expensive cities?

I don’t think so. I am more than happy to have government help people in need relocate to more affordable locations. But if one wants to retire in D.C. or Manhattan or SF or Hawaii then one had better have a very good retirement plan AND a couple of contingencies in case it doesn’t work out. There are a lot of nice, cheap places to live in this country.

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Hey we could send them to Mexico!

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A larger part of this is reversing out supply-side economics for the next 40 years. Giving younger people coming into adulthood a lot more to live for and a better health profile.

Supply-side economics has killed a lot of people.

It has also killed a lot of businesses.

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And even if they do want to lump retirees in the mix, they don’t mean “retirees”, they mean “retirees who chose to spend all their money while working rather than saving some of it”.

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And, how much do you think they can save while working at McDonalds?

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Or “retirees who believed the promises in the employee handbook about a company funded pension and retiree medical, then the JCs took them away”.

Steve

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I’m going to quibble a bit with thee. I agree with your implication that certainly there are in every population those kinds of fools and many just happen to be retired. No argument there. But there are also those who can be numbered among the simply unfortunate. Life isn’t good to everyone and many despite their efforts, get clobbered. Some of those would also be numbered among the retired. And among the tall and the short and the blued eyed and the browned eyed.

But I hate it when articles imply that “the retired” i.e. anyone who is retired are somehow totally blameless for their poverty as if it was as hard to get by as with a physical or mental deficit. The implication I see is: there ain’t really enough unfortunates to pity, especially ones who aren’t “unattractive & off-putting” like drug addicts, alcoholics, and those people you mentioned who just “exercised their freedom to choose” until they were left holding the bag. So, they find some other group to lump in there to up the numbers and “use their words” to paint a deceptive picture of “poverty”.

I am as “socialist” as any of the Left Leaners here. One of my degrees is in Sociology. I ought to have a spot in MSNBC. I know there are problems. And one of them is misrepresentation by both sides and too much “violin playing.”

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Where I live in WA State, “low income” housing requires an income at the 40% percentile or above. Where are the 40% of the population with incomes below that supposed to live? Property developers complain that even with generous tax breaks, they can’t build anything cheaper, without making the profit they desire.

Maybe instead of giving tax breaks to wealthy developers, the county needs to build some barracks-style housing just to keep people off the streets.

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The residents of Lucky House in Hong Kong are anything but fortunate. They are some of the poorest people in the most expensive city in the world.In one of its 46 sq metre (500 sq ft) apartments, 30 residents live in purpose-built plywood bunk beds each with its own sliding door, colloquially known as coffins. Two rows of bunks, 16 bunks in each row – still space for two more people.

…When I enter my coffin for the first time, I immediately notice the strong musty smell. I imagine the other residents in their bunks, each one roughly 60cm (two feet) wide and 170cm (5 ft 7 in) long, with only enough space to sit up.

The human “population bomb” is the cause of almost every political, social, and philosophical problem of the 21st century

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Mrs. Goofy and I lived for 6 months in an RV with 330 sq ft of space. This is not as awful as they make it sound.

Although it was a shameful episode in our history, we managed to build housing (of a sort) in record time at the beginning of World War II when we shipped anyone of Japanese heritage to encampments far from the West Coast. I don’t know if something like that is feasible, but hey, people in Idaho could use a little socializing, as far as I can tell.

I think you mis-read. You and the Mrs. Need to bring a couple dozen friends along in your RV.

In one of its 46 sq metre (500 sq ft) apartments, 30 residents live

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But that’s two people living in 330 sq ft, compared to 46 sq metre (500 sq ft) apartments, 30 residents live in purpose-built plywood bunk beds each with its own sliding door, colloquially known as coffins., in other words 30 people living in 500 sq ft in 2’ by 5’7" boxes with one bathroom and shower for everyone.

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Sounds like the space on the Lex where my rack was, except we didn’t have niceties like doors, or curtains. So, what’s the problem?

Steve

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