Pope not taking any gruff from Texas

In a rare move, the Pope dismissed the ultra-conservative Bishop of Tyler, Texas when he failed to get with the new DEI program of baptising transgendered individuals. If you want to keep the big hat, you better fall in line.

intercst

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The article does not include the word transgender.

Most Catholics are baptized as infants. How can they be transgender?

Are we talking about adult baptisms? Or children of transgender parents?

This seems a bit of a stretch. He was conservative and opposed church policies.

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It is about a lot more than “DEI” and other cultural war carnival sideshows.

Bishop Strickland is one of the leading Bishops prepping to lead a schism in Roman Catholicism if Francis’ successor turns out to be a Pope intent on continuing towards “reform modernization” of the church along the lines begun by John XXIII and now fully reinvigorated by Francis (leaving aside the extremely short but clearly strongly anti-medievalist anti-monarchist push of Pope John Paul I). As Francis has now appointed a large portion of the Cardinals who will be voting, the next Pope likely will not be loved by Bishop Strickland and similar Bishops worldwide.

Strickland, besides being an arch conservative, is trapped in his own maze of fears and hatreds, particularly of all manner of people who are neither celibate nor actively procreative of children. I find his scornful scoffing at the church’s role in suicides by gay identifying children utterly irresponsible and defiant of the gospel.

When Francis leaves power either by death or retirement, the Catholic Church will almost certainly enter a very very difficult period of schism, and battle lines are already being drawn and prepped.

david fb

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intercst

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I make every effort to be civil toward my conservative Christian in-laws even though bigotry appears to be a core value for them.

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Baptism is one of the sacraments but probably not the one the gay community is most concerned about. I’d say sloppy reporting.

As David points out, it’s about welcoming all to the Church without judgement. The transgendered baptism thing just happened to be what ticked off that bigoted cleric in Texas. The Pope dealt with him within 24 hours. Monarchy has its privileges.

intercst

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It’s good to be king.

Does anyone else find it odd that an “ultra-conservative” bishop would be quartered in Texas? How utterly strange.

Pete

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Yes. And in fact Baptism and Communion are among our most cruxial battles.

In the early days of organizing from the late 60’s into the 90’s, Gay and Lesbian Christians were outdone in ferocity of commitment only by impoverished transvestite prostitutes, and in numbers only by late to the battle privileged clone boomer boys (like me) in big cities.

Crucially but overlooked – not matching stereotypes nor idiot lazy reporting – by far the largest homosexual organization in the world during the most difficult days of the early gay rights movement in the 60’s, 70’s, and 80’s, when concentration camp and legalized gay murder bills were appearing in state legislatures, was this bunch:

Jesse Jackson during his run for the Presidency in 1984, said (to the outrage of many) that the Holy Spirit had been and was empowering and guiding Gays and Lesbian Christians in their struggle every bit as much as the Civil Rights Movement.

MCC is still extremely important, but fading in relative importance as more and more Christian sects have “seen the light”. The Roman Catholics are a much larger and more history laden bunch, and are taking time. However, they are well on their way.

david fb
(Sunday School teacher and Senior Warden at the Episcopal Church of the Holy Nativity back in the 80’s and 90’s, and now a regular communicant at the Sanctuario de Atotonilco, Mexico, and Iglesia San Bartomeu of Sóller, Mallorca, Spain.)
(I was at different times briefly barred from both of those Roman Catholic parishes by angry bigoted Priests, causing many parishioners to leave in solidarity with me for masses at nearby monasteres, ultimately leading to changes in higher church leadership.)

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The bishops in Texas and every other state take orders from the Pope. The state of Texas has no say in the matter.

This one apparently not so much anymore :rofl:

Pete

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I just wish this pope would bring back Limbo.

Just saw this video by James Carville explaining the formative years of the new Speaker along with some colorful Louisiana history. Apparently all the stuff Pope Pius IX marked for reform in the 1864 Syllabus of Errors, these Christian nationalists would like to reinstate.

intercst

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FIrst, OH WOW! and Thank you!

At last I have an outline of the insanity when before all I had was the often contradictory mutterings of TOOWMNBN and his desperately secondary media minions. And I knew it wasn’t Mein Kampf because that has more, uhm, coherence.

Second. :face_vomiting:

Third: This is worth real attention and thought, as there will be significant investment dangers and opportunities whether the agenda comes through or fails.

david fb

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Maybe he can trade in his miter for a cowboy hat.

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On the magnificent rambling Carville video you can jump right to the essence of political economy at 19:45

Wow.

david fb

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Carville’s little “explanation” is pretty good.

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Or “The Limbo”

intercst

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