The not so green side of Lithium

https://www.sciencenews.org/article/lithium-mining-flamingo-…
Flamingos may be a kind of canary in the coal mine when it comes to warning of a hidden cost of green technologies. Lithium mining appears to be a major threat to the iconic pink birds that rely on ecologically fragile salt flats bordering the high Andes Mountains. Mining of the metal and climate change together are causing the decline of two flamingo species found only on Andean plateaus, researchers report March 9 in the Proceedings of the Royal Society B.

TANSTASFL

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Gorgeous birds!

https://www.google.com/search?q=corocoro+bird+venezuela&…

2. Flamingos get their pink color from their food.
Flamingos really are what they eat. Many plants produce natural red, yellow or orange pigments, called carotenoids. Carotenoids give carrots their orange color or turn ripe tomatoes red. They are also found in the microscopic algae that brine shrimp eat. As a flamingo dines on algae and brine shrimp, its body metabolizes the pigments — turning its feathers pink.

https://nationalzoo.si.edu/animals/news/why-are-flamingos-pi…

The Captain

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Name a mining operation anywhere that is not opposed by environmentalists. They are forever looking for some excuse–no matter how trivial.

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Did you translate that from a Vogon poem?

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Lithium mining in CA is ramping up fast. With battery factories in CA, it makes for less transportation costs and take pressure of the salt flats bordering the high Andes Mountains.

Jaak