Tesla unveils solar range extender

… I think this is “peak Tesla”, before they start circling the drain.

Tesla unveils solar range extender trailer with SpaceX Starlink internet terminal
https://electrek.co/2022/07/04/tesla-unveils-solar-range-ext…

intercst

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I guess you’ve never noticed that every car maker shows off things like “concept cars” at shows that never get produced.

This is probably a good idea though, for at least a few people. Some people Ukraine would probably like a few of them to go with their Starlink systems.

Mike

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mschmit writes,

I guess you’ve never noticed that every car maker shows off things like “concept cars” at shows that never get produced.

This is probably a good idea though, for at least a few people. Some people Ukraine would probably like a few of them to go with their Starlink systems.

I think it’s fine as an off-the-grid satellite Internet station. As a “range extender”, not so much.

If we don’t get much cheaper batteries, I still think the sweet spot is going to be a 40-60 mile battery that covers 90%-95% of the average American’s daily driving. And some kind of small ICE running a generator for the occasional longer trip.

intercst

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This kind of thing would probably be popular with the prepper crowd. Perfect for a road trip with your Cybertruck in a post-apocalyptic world.

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If we don’t get much cheaper batteries, I still think the sweet spot is going to be a 40-60 mile battery

That would be a 15 kwh battery approximately? At current production costs, the difference to a 70 kwh battery is about 7700 dollars. Not prohibitive, even for a middle-class car.

And I see no reason to assume that battery prices will stop declining any time soon.

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intercst:“If we don’t get much cheaper batteries, I still think the sweet spot is going to be a 40-60 mile battery that covers 90%-95% of the average American’s daily driving. And some kind of small ICE running a generator for the occasional longer trip.”

You just defined ‘plug in hybrid’ and Toyota is one of the leaders in this space and has been for 20 years with the Prius and then the Plug in Prius.

the new Prius gets 55 mpg on the road and around town. Add plug in, and it probably uses 2 gal a month just to keep the engine in running shape if you drive around town.

And no…a family car is likely to go 100 miles a day as mom runs errands, kids got to go to soccer practice and drama club and this and that, and dad has meetings at night as well as picking up the kids after activities.

The commute car? maybe…

t.

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You just defined ‘plug in hybrid’ and Toyota is one of the leaders in this space and has been for 20 years with the Prius and then the Plug in Prius.

I’ve been eyeing plug-in-hybrids for our next car (I drive a 2007 Accord & Ms. Wolf a 2012 Civic). So yesterday I noticed a Prius in a parking lot and while I was looking it over, I noticed a bumper sticker on it:

0 to 60 in 2.3 seconds
Off a cliff

Anyway, made me laugh.

AW

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intercst:“If we don’t get much cheaper batteries, I still think the sweet spot is going to be a 40-60 mile battery that covers 90%-95% of the average American’s daily driving. And some kind of small ICE running a generator for the occasional longer trip.”

t: the new Prius gets 55 mpg on the road and around town. Add plug in, and it probably uses 2 gal a month just to keep the engine in running shape if you drive around town.

I still have the original Prius plugin (2012). Great car but pure BEVs are going to win out IMO even though logically and mathematically it “seems” like a small battery (compared to an EV) plus a gas engine gives you the best of both worlds. EV driving for daily commute and around town and easy gas fill ups on long road trips.

But you also get the worst of both in some ways. You have to maintain the gas engine. Oil changes and other maintenance. Even though you don’t use the engine much Toyota still requires maintenance on a per mile basis rather than per ICE mile for warranty purposes. But more likely it is a dealership profit reason. You also still have to carry around the rarely used engine everywhere you go and give up the possible frunk cargo space. Conveniently, lots of batteries, such as in the Tesla’s go under the floor and add to low center of mass weight distribution. And then you still have the potential fires from gasoline which are much more common than battery fires.

Mike

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